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Course Catalog Resources

RN-to-BSN Track

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Program Description

The RN-to-BSN Track is a BSN program option designed to further develop skills, reasoning, and attributes of licensed professional registered nurses (RNs). The RN-to-BSN curriculum is grounded in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing. A total of one hundred twenty (120) semester credits is required for the conferral of the BSN degree. Upon enrollment, learners are granted forty-eight (48) semester credits of lower-division core nursing coursework pursuant to the RN licensure. The RN-to-BSN Track consists of twenty-four (24) semester credits of upper-division nursing coursework. In addition, the completion of the BSN degree requires forty-eight (48) semester credits of general education. Learners who hold an Associate of Science in Nursing Degree and transfer a minimum twenty-seven (27) semester credits of general education, including the required physical sciences credits, can complete the RN-to-BSN Track within three (3) academic semesters, or forty-eight (48) academic weeks of instruction. Learners who have not completed any general education requirements and elect to complete all GE coursework at the College can complete the RN-to-BSN Track within five (5) academic semesters, or eighty (80) academic weeks of instruction. The table below illustrates the estimated program completion time based on the number of general education credits transferred in upon enrollment.

Number of GE Credits Transferred

In

Semesters to Complete RN-to-BSN Track

Weeks of Instruction to Complete

 RN-to-BSN Track

0-10

5

80

11-26

4

64

27-41

3

48

42-48

2

32

 

The RN-to-BSN Track uses full-distance delivery of instruction where learners engage in online didactic and capstone project experiences in community nursing, leadership, policy, ethics, critical care, gerontology, health promotion, disease prevention, informatics, and other key nursing concepts. For learner residency and course delivery modalities definitions, see the Learner Residency and Course Delivery Modalities section of this Catalog. The curriculum is specifically constructed to promote career mobility in nursing. Upon satisfactory completion of the prescribed RN-to-BSN curriculum and other graduation requirements, the learner will earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Degree.

Note: The Program only enrolls residents in states where it is fully authorized. If a learner enrolls in the Program and subsequently moves to a state where the Program is not authorized, the learner will not be able to continue enrollment until such authorization is obtained. Learners must notify the Registrar immediately upon relocation.

Program Objectives

  • Graduate baccalaureate-level nurses who will improve individual, family, and community health and wellness by applying clinical reasoning, evidence-based skills and knowledge, and leadership in practice.
  • Facilitate career mobility of graduates and help meet the demand for professional nurses.
  • Increase the availability of advanced nursing education opportunities for qualified learners.
  • Improve access to nursing education, course scheduling flexibility, and learning efficacy through various innovative instruction delivery methods and learning modalities, including synchronous and asynchronous online engagements, capstone activities, and distance learning.

Program Outcomes

RN-to-BSN Outcomes are aligned with the Institutional Effectiveness Plan and measure the degree to which the Program achieves its stated mission.

RN-to-BSN Learner Outcomes
The RN-to-BSN Track, in alignment with the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) Standards for Accreditation of Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Programs, has identified program outcomes, including program-level learner outcomes and competencies, alumni outcomes, and faculty outcomes to evaluate Nightingale College’s RN-to-BSN Track effectiveness. The learner outcomes include program completion and employment rates, achievement of Nightingale College’s undergraduate general education goals, achievement of expected learner outcomes, satisfaction with courses and instruction, and satisfaction with overall program effectiveness.

At Program completion, as measured by evaluation activities throughout the RN-to-BSN Track, the graduate will:

  1. Exemplify quality, competent, client-centered care while demonstrating awareness of the physical, psychological, spiritual, emotional, cultural, and environmental aspects of the clients’ needs.
  2. Demonstrate intentional learning, clinical reasoning, and reflection to purposefully lead in the profession and provide holistic care to their clients.
  3. Integrate and perform research in nursing’s identified best practices and demonstrate the ability to practice based on evidence they have analyzed and applied in their profession.
  4. Synthesize clinical reasoning into daily nursing practice, while integrating ethical, moral, legal, and evidence-based principles.
  5. Exemplify leadership and management skills and attributes appropriate for their role as BSN-level registered nurses.
  6. Engage in effective communication—therapeutically and professionally—with and without the use of technology.
  7. Integrate components of quality and best safety practices into the daily nursing work environments.
  8. Integrate collaborative leadership skills when leading and functioning as a member of interdisciplinary teams.

Core Competencies

  1. Client-Centered Care
  2. Intentional Learning with Reflection
  3. Evidence-Based Practice
  4. Decision-Making and Clinical Reasoning
  5. Organizational, Local, and Global Leadership
  6. Communication and Informatics
  7. Quality and Safety Assurance
  8. Teamwork and Collaboration

Requirements and Procedures

All applicants work closely with an Admissions Advisor to assess career goals, motivation, and commitment to learning.

To be considered for admission, an applicant must meet the following requirements:

  1. Pay the $150 non-refundable application fee (the application fee is waived for all Nightingale College’s prelicensure programs alumni and active duty servicemembers and veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces).
  2. Complete Application for Admissions (the application and the paid fee are valid for one (1) year).
  3. Submit a copy of a high school diploma equivalent, as described below, one week prior to the first day of attendance.

Recognized Equivalents of a High School Diploma

Several equivalents to a high school diploma may be submitted:

  • a GED certificate;
  • a certificate or other official completion documentation demonstrating that the learner has passed a state-authorized examination such as the Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC), the High School Equivalency Test (HiSET), or, in California, the California High School Proficiency Exam, that the state recognizes as the equivalent of a high school diploma (certificates of attendance and/or completion are not included in this qualifying category);
  • an associate degree;
  • successful completion of at least sixty (60) semester or trimester credits or seventy-two (72) quarter credits that does not result in the awarding of an associate degree, but that is acceptable for full credit toward a bachelor’s degree at any institution; or
  • enrollment in a bachelor’s degree program where at least sixty (60) semester or trimester credits or seventy-two (72) quarter credits have been successfully completed, including credits transferred into the bachelor’s degree program;
  • a “secondary school leaving certificate” or similar document from the proper government agency for learners who completed secondary school in a foreign country, accompanied by a foreign credentials evaluation.
  1. Submit proof of current active unencumbered registered nurse (RN) licensure from any U.S. jurisdiction and disclose any encumbered licenses. Nightingale College’s prelicensure programs graduates may enroll in the RN-to-BSN Track, on a non-matriculated basis, upon providing proof of submitting the RN licensure application and passing the NCLEX-RN® Learners must become licensed within the first academic semester of the Program to matriculate and progress within the RN-to-BSN Track.
  2. If requesting transfer of credit, submit official college transcripts for the previous post-secondary coursework by the deadline in accordance with the Transfer of Credit section of the Catalog.
    • Forty-eight (48) general education credits are required for the BSN Degree. Learners may refer to the table below for the minimum number of credits required in each of the five (5) general education breadth areas. General education requirements may be met either through completing the course work at the College or through the transfer of credit (see Transfer of Credit section of this Catalog for more information). Up to twenty-one (21) GE semester credits can be completed during the RN-to-BSN Track. Applicants who do not have the minimum twenty-seven (27) GE semester credits upon admission may extend their enrollment in the RN-to-BSN Track to fulfill all general education requirements.
    • Official transcripts are required for matriculation into the RN-to-BSN Track.
    • The College reserves the right to accept or reject any and all credits earned at other post- secondary institutions or through course challenge exams.
  3. Complete Smarter Measure Assessment for evaluation of online learning readiness.
  4. Meet with a Learner Funding Advisor to initiate the Financial Aid process.
  5. Be in good financial standing with the College and have $0 account balance.

Note: The highest level of academic integrity is expected throughout the admissions process. Violations of the academic integrity policy at any point in the admissions process will result in automatic denial of admission. See the Academic Integrity section of the College Catalog for more details.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Table

Total Credits Attempted

Financial Aid Warning or Probation if CGPA is below

Financial Aid Warning or Probation if course completion rate is below

1-12

2.0

67%

13-24

2.0

67%

25-36

2.0

67%

37-48

2.0

67%

49-60

2.0

67%

61-72

2.0

67%

73-84

2.0

67%

85-96

2.0

67%

97-108

2.0

67%

109-120

2.0

67%

Tuition and Fees

Tuition for the RN-to-BSN Track is $630 per semester credit. The College reserves the right to change its tuition and fees at any time with a 30-day notice. Audit fees are non-refundable and cannot be paid with Title IV funding.

Item

 

General Education Fee per Course (except SCI 220, SCI 221, and SCI 251)

 $1251

Nursing Fee per Course

 $150

SCI 220, SCI 221, SCI 251 Learning Resources Fee per Course

 $200

Remote Proctoring Fee per Semester

 $125

Course Audit Fee

 $200

1In lieu of the $125 course resources fee, learners may elect to personally purchase all general education required materials.

 

Nightingale College Alumni Tuition Reduction
A tuition reduction of $280 per semester credit will be applied to the accounts of the College’s associate degree graduates at the time tuition is charged. The Nightingale College Alumni Tuition Reduction is not applicable to repeat coursework.

Estimated Total Program Cost
The estimated total program cost for a learner who holds an associate degree in nursing and transfers in sixty-eight (68) semester credits is $30,950.

General Education Requirements

A combination of forty-eight (48) semester credits of general education and elective courses is required for graduation. Up to twenty-one (21) of these semester credits may be completed during the RN-to-BSN Program. Applicants who do not have the minimum twenty-seven (27) combined general education and elective semester credits upon admission may extend their enrollment in the RN-to-BSN Track to fulfill all requirements. Learners may refer to the Admissions Requirements and Procedures section above for more information.

Physical & Life Sciences
A minimum of fifteen (15) semester credits is required in this category. The courses listed below as well as other college-level physical and life science courses are considered for the fulfillment of the GE requirements.

Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are mandatory.

Course

Semester Credits

Human Anatomy with lab*

4

Human Physiology with lab*

4

Pathophysiology*

3-5

Microbiology with lab

3-5

Biology

3-5

Chemistry

3-5

Environmental Science

3-5

Physics

3-5

English & Communication Arts
A minimum of six (6) credits is required in this category.

Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are mandatory.

Course

Semester Credits

Technical Writing*

3-5

English Composition*

3-5

Academic Writing

3-5

Communications

3-5

Mathematics
A minimum of six (6) credits is required in this category.

Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are mandatory.

Course

Semester Credits

Statistics*

3-5

College Algebra*

3-5

Human Behavior & Social Sciences
A minimum of six (6) credits is required in this category.
Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are mandatory.  

Course

Semester Credits

Psychology*

3-5

Human Growth & Development

3-5

Sociology

3-5

Abnormal Psychology

3-5

Cultural Anthropology

3-5

Organizational Behavior

3-5

Macroeconomics

3-5

United States History

3-5

Humanities & Fine Arts
A minimum of six (6) credits is required in this category.
Courses marked with an asterisk(*) are mandatory.  

Course

Semester Credits

Religion

3-5

Applied Ethics

3-5

Western Civilization

3-5

Other Electives
A minimum of six (6) credits is required in this category.

Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are mandatory.

 

Course

Semester Credits

Nutrition*

3-5

Upper-Division Elective(s)
A minimum of three (3) semester credits of any additional upper-division elective course(s) is required in this category.

Upper-Division Elective

3-5

A combination of forty-eight (48) semester credits of general education and elective courses is required for graduation. Up to twenty-one (21) of these semester credits may be completed during RN-to-BSN Track. Applicants who do not have the minimum twenty-seven (27) combined general education and elective semester credits upon admission may extend their enrollment in the RN-to-BSN Track to fulfill all requirements. Refer to the Admissions Requirements and Procedures section above for more information.

A combined total of forty-eight (48) general education (GE) and elective credits is required for the BSN Degree.

Curriculum

The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice provides an important framework for designing and assessing baccalaureate education. The original purpose of the Essentials is to “delineate the essentials of education for professional baccalaureate nursing practice" (AACN, 2008). Because professional nursing practice in all settings requires consideration of the individual, family, community, and population as client, these outcomes are essential to baccalaureate nursing education offered by Nightingale College.

 

  • Essential I: Liberal Education for Baccalaureate Generalist Nursing Practice
  • Essential II: Basic Organizational and Systems Leadership for Quality Care and Patient Safety
  • Essential III: Scholarship for Evidence-Based Practice
  • Essential IV: Information Management and Application of Patient Care Technology
  • Essential V: Healthcare Policy, Finance, and Regulatory Environments
  • Essential VI: Interprofessional Communication and Collaboration for Improving Patient Health Outcomes
  • Essential VII: Clinical Prevention and Population Health
  • Essential VIII: Professionalism and Professional Values
  • Essential IX: Baccalaureate Generalist Nursing Practice

The RN-to-BSN Track consists of nine (9) upper-division nursing courses delivered over three (3) academic semesters and forty-eight (48) academic weeks, for a total of twenty-four (24) semester credits. There are three hundred sixty (360) didactic contact hours total. The RN-to-BSN Track does not have any experiential learning contact hours assigned. However, the Track requires the completion of community- and employer-based learning projects. The Curriculum Plan table presented below represents a Program Plan for learners who transfer in twenty-seven (27) general education semester credits.

GE Breadth Area

Number of Semester Credits Transferred In

Physical & Life Sciences

15*

English & Communication Arts

3

Mathematics

3

General Electives**

6

*Science credits include human anatomy, human physiology, and pathophysiology.

**Depending on a learner’s state of residence, SCI 251 and SCI 131 may need to be taken as elective courses due to specific State Board of Nursing requirements.

The RN-to-BSN Track is a full-distance program option where all didactic instruction is delivered via asynchronous online learning modalities. For learner residency and course delivery modalities definitions, see the Learner Residency and Course Delivery Modalities section of this Catalog. For learning modalities definitions see Learning Modalities Definitions section in this Catalog.  A sample curriculum layout is presented in the table below.

 

Sample Curriculum Plan

RN-to-BSN Track Sample Curriculum Plan

Course Number Course Name Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
Level V
MAT 220 Distance 3 45               45
ENG 311 Distance 3 45               45
COM 3011 Distance 3 45               45
BSN 235 Distance 3 45               45
BSN 355 Distance 1 15               15
BSN 435 Distance 3 45               45
Total 16 240  0  0  0  0  0  0  0 240
Level VI
HUM 3012 Distance 3 45               45
SOC 2203 Distance 3 45               45
BSN 3254 Blended 4 52.5             22.5 75
BSN 375 Distance 2 30               30
BSN 425 Distance 3 45               45
Total 15 217.5             22.5 240
Level VII
ANT 3003 Distance 3 45               45
HUM 1102 Distance 3 45               45
BSN 445 Distance 3 45               45
BSN 465 Distance 3 45               45
BSN 4854 Blended   15             45 60
Total 14 195             45 240
Total Program 45 652.5             67.5 720
Nursing Courses Total
24                  
General Education 21                  
RN-to-BSN Track Total 45 652.5             67.5 620
BSN Degree Nursing Courses 72                  
BSN General Education 48                  
BSN Degree Total 120                  

 

Standardized Exams

Standardized end-of-course exams are administered at the end of each level of the BSN Program. Required scores for mandatory remediation on standardized exams are specified in the table below.

Standardized Exam Schedule for Generic BSN Learners:
HESI Exam Course Mandatory Remediation HWESI Score
RN Specialty: Dosage Calculation BSN 215 < 900
RN Specialty: Fundamentals of Nursing BSN 225 < 900
RN Specialty: Health Assessment BSN 246 < 900
RN Specialty: Pharmacology BSN 305 or BSN 315 < 900
RN Specialty: Medical-Surgical Nursing BSN 266 < 900
RN Custom: BSN 346 BSN 346 < 900
RN Exit BSN 366 < 900

 

ENG 120 : English Composition
Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: The course helps learners develop quality writing skills by explaining and identifying the steps involved in the writing process. Six (6) types of writing are examined: argumentative, compare/contrast, descriptive, narrative, persuasive, and summary. Learners will write a minimum of twenty (20) pages as a requirement for the course. The importance of proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling is highlighted, as emphasis is placed on editing and revising pieces of writing. Learners also learn proper research techniques, utilizing the American Psychological Association (APA) style.
HUM 110 : Western Civilization I
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course introduces civilization from pre-history to the early modern era. Western Civilization refers to the civilization that began in the ancient Near East and then developed primarily in Europe, northern Africa, and the westernmost edges of Asia. Learners will concentrate on several major themes: the rise and fall of the ancient and classical civilizations that were forerunners to the rise of the West, the cultural legacy of these civilizations, the changing role of religion in society and changes in religion itself, and the development of political institutions. Topics include ancient Greece, Rome, and Christian institutions of the Middle Ages and the emergence of national monarchies in western Europe.
MAT 100 : College Algebra
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course provides knowledge of Intermediate Algebra and its applications. The course emphasizes algebraic techniques with polynomials, rational expressions, exponents, radical expressions and equations, factoring, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, logarithmic and exponential functions, and solving systems of two or more linear equations.
MAT 220 : Introduction to Statistics
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: MAT 100 or equivalent
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: In this course, learners will examine the properties behind the basic concepts of probability and statistics and focus on applications of statistical knowledge. Learners will learn how statistics and probability work together. The subject of statistics involves the study of methods for collecting, summarizing, and interpreting data. Learners will learn how to understand the basics of drawing statistical conclusions. This course will begin with descriptive statistics and the foundation of statistics, then move to probability and random distributions, the latter of which enables statisticians to work with several aspects of random events and their applications. Finally, learners will examine several ways to investigate the relationships between various characteristics of data.
PSY 201 : Introduction to Psychology
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course is designed to give the learner a basic understanding of the psychology of human behavior. The learner will be given exposure to the concepts, terminology, principles, and theories that comprise an introductory course in psychology. Topics covered will synthesize the broad range of knowledge about psychology, emphasize research methodology, encourage critical thinking, and convey a multicultural approach that respects human diversity and individual differences.
SCI 220 : Human Anatomy with Intervention Skill-Based (ISB) Experiential Learning
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction, Virtual ISB Instruction)
Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 ISB)
Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 ISB)
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: SCI 221 (or equivalent): Human Physiology with Intervention Skill- Based (ISB) Experiential Learning
Requisites: None
Description: In conjunction with SCI 221: Human Physiology, this course provides a comprehensive look at the human body’s anatomy and functions. Topics include organization of the body, characteristics of life, and anatomical terminology. The course examines skin, skeletal system, muscles, digestive, urinary, lymphatic, circulatory, reproductive, and nervous systems. The course also presents sensory organs and the endocrine system. This course contains an intervention skill-based experiential learning component (one [1] credit hour), where learners will practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (three [3] semester credits) of the course.
SCI 221 : Human Physiology with Intervention Skill-Based (ISB) Experiential Learning
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction, Virtual ISB Instruction)
Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 ISB)
Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 ISB)
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: SCI 220 (or equivalent): Human Anatomy with Intervention Skill-Based (ISB) Experiential Learning
Requisites: None
Description: In conjunction with SCI 220: Human Anatomy, this course examines major parts of the body and how they work independently as well as together. The course also explains principles related to nutrition, metabolism, body fluid balances, and aging. The course also presents how the body maintains homeostasis, the relationship of chemistry to human anatomy and physiology, and cell function and division. The course discusses several diseases and disorders as well as their causes, detection, and treatment. This course contains an intervention skill-based experiential learning component (one [1] credit hour), where learners will practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (three [3] semester credits) of the course.
SCI 225 : Pathophysiology
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits of human anatomy and human physiology
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course describes the general principles of disease, then presents information dealing with specific disorders of body systems or individual organs. The purpose of this course is to provide the learner with basic understanding of pathophysiology as a change from normal physiological functioning of the various systems of the human body. The course is based on illness and disease within a systems framework across the lifespan. This course emphasizes select illnesses most often encountered by health professionals. The course focuses on critical thinking used to analyze the signs and symptoms based on the pathophysiology of these conditions.
SOC 220 : Introduction to Sociology
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, learners should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies.

 

ANT 300 : Cultural Anthropology
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course provides a solid introduction for learners who are new to the branch of cultural anthropology. The course presents learners with all the basic information pertinent to the field. The topics discussed include relevant anthropological theories, ethnocentrism and culture, language and communication, economic and political systems, kinship and descent, marriage and family, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, religion and belief systems, the effects of colonialism and industrialization, and globalization.

 

COM 301 : Oral Communication
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course in speech is designed to develop each learner's ability to communicate effectively in academic, business, and personal lives. The course covers an overview of various models of communication, alongside discussion of the benefits and elements of effective communication processes. The course will discuss both verbal and nonverbal communication, emphasizing development and presentation of a variety of speech types including informative, persuasive, and special occasion.

 

ENG 311 : Professional and Academic Writing
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: ENG 120 or equivalent
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course focuses on the development of professional skills in the research, design, and communication of technical and academic information. Emphasis is placed on audience analysis, clear and effective writing style, and the use of visual elements. These skills are honed through the creation, editing, and peer review of documents written in a variety of professional and academic formats such as letters, emails, persuasive essays, research essays, and cover letters.

 

HUM 301 : Applied Ethics
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: After a brief introduction to philosophical texts, the Socratic method, and the structure of argumentation, learners will begin their journey to identify, interpret, and then construct solutions to normative ethical theories. Learners will study the fundamental ethical principles from the top three approaches of our time, Utilitarianism, Kantianism, and Virtue Theory. Learners will then apply the leading theories to their discipline, composing arguments for ethical and well-reasoned approaches to critical issues. Overall, this course seeks to build a foundation of philosophy and ethics that learners will incorporate into their chosen nursing field.
SCI 131 : Introduction to Nutrition
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course will provide an understanding of basic nutrition science. Learners will become familiar with the principles of diet planning, government standards, and food labeling. They will also learn about the biological functions and food sources of each nutrient, energy balance, weight management, physical activity, the role of nutrition in chronic disease development, nutrition through the life cycle, and food safety issues.
SCI 251 : Microbiology with Intervention Skill-Based (ISB) Experiential Learning
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction, Virtual ISB Instruction)
Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 ISB)
Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 ISB)
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course teaches microbiology as it applies to the healthcare field. The course will explore pathogenic microorganisms and their role in human disease, human immunology, symptoms and treatment of microbial infection, and preventive measures against microbial infection. This course contains an intervention skill-based experiential learning component (one [1] credit hour), where learners will be able to practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (three [3] semester credits) of the course.
ENG 320 : Creative Writing
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: ENG 120
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course introduces learners to the written formats of creative fiction and creative non-fiction, providing an overview of the creative writing process. Assignments will cover a wide variety of formats, including prose writing, poetry writing, and script writing. Through assigned readings, weekly writing prompts, and class critiques, learners will develop their sense of narrative structure, traditional plot structure, audience engagement, and standard manuscript style. The class will explore writing skills such as revision techniques, point-of-view, and theme as well as the importance of close reading for editing and analysis purposes.
PSY 300 : Human Development
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45 (Didactic)
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: PSY 201 or Equivalent
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course will give learners a broad overview of the field of human development. Covering the entire human lifespan, from conception to death, this course explores concepts, terminology, principles, and theories that comprise an introductory course in human development. The course will examine biological, cognitive, and emotional growth and development within each developmental stage. The course will also explore grief and bereavement and self-care for the caregiver. The course will explore and apply current research methods and cultural influences through the lifespan.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 206 Distance 5 22 11 1.5 45 45       127.5
BSN 206 : Foundations of Nursing Fundamentals
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 5
Contact Hours: 127.5
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math.
Corequisites: None
Requisites: PSY 201, SCI 131, and SCI 225
Description: This course introduces the fundamental concepts necessary for safe patient-centered nursing care to a diverse patient population while integrating clinical decision-making. Critical thinking, clinical reasoning, and the nursing process are key foundations to nursing practice. Application of knowledge and practice of skills occur in a variety of clinical settings providing care to stable patients with common health issues.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 215 Distance 2 30               30
BSN 215 : Pharmacology I
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 2
Contact Hours: 30
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math
Corequisites: None
Requisites: PSY 201, SCI 131, and SCI 225
Description: This course is an overview of the basic principles of pharmacology, including major drug classifications and prototypes of commonly used medications. Principles of medication administration include aspects of the best practices for safe, quality, patient-centered care. Central points of the course include safety, quality improvement factors in the administration of medications, patient teaching, and variations encountered when administering medications to diverse patient populations across the lifespan.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 225 Blended 5 21.5 4 4.5 15 45 67.5     157.5
BSN 225 : Concepts of Nursing – Health Promotion
Delivery Modality: Blended
Semester Credits: 5
Contact Hours: 157.5
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math and BSN 206
Corequisites: None
Requisites: PSY 201, SCI 131, SCI 225, and BSN 215
Description: This course focuses on the role of the professional nurse in promoting optimal health for individual clients. The course will discuss basic psychomotor nursing skills and introduce learners to medical/surgical nursing for low-risk clients. This course also provides the learner with techniques for carrying out a physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and cultural assessment to evaluate clients’ well-being. The course also introduces learners to assessment devices and procedures to collect data. The course focuses on health promotion, health protection, disease prevention and communication strategies throughout the lifespan.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 235  Distance 3 45               45
BSN 235 : Nursing Communication and Informatics
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 3
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math
Corequisites: None
Requisites: MAT 220
Description: In this course, learners will explore and gain advanced knowledge and skills in information management, patient care technology, and effective interpersonal communication modalities. Nursing informatics is a combination of cognitive science, computer science, information science, and nursing science. It includes the development, analysis, and evaluation of information systems, which are augmented by technology that helps to support, enhance, and manage client care. In this course, learners will examine information management tools used to monitor outcomes of care processes, client care technologies essential to ensuring high quality, safe patient care, and communication and collaboration skills necessary to providing optimal client-centered care. The course will emphasize key concepts related to information and computer literacy.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 246  Blended 6 35 7 3 30 45 45     165
BSN 246 : Concepts of Nursing I
Delivery Modality: Blended
Semester Credits: 6
Contact Hours: 165
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math; BSN 206 and BSN 225, or equivalent
Corequisites: None
Requisites: PSY 201, SCI 131, SCI 225, and BSN 215
Description: This course focuses on the chronic nature of certain states of being when nursing a client at various stages in life, focusing on the application of the nursing process in meeting needs of clients in various settings. The course will explore concepts related to emotional problems, pathological reactions to life stresses, and chronic pain. The course will emphasize the therapeutic relationships and the development of individualized plans of care. The course will address communication skills, mental health assessment, various therapeutic balances, and sensory perception. Direct focused client care experiential learning will give learners the opportunity to gain experience with many of these chronic conditions.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 266 Blended 6 35 7 3 30 45 45     165
BSN 266 : Concepts of Nursing II
Delivery Modality: Blended
Semester Credits: 6
Contact Hours: 165
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math; BSN 206; BSN 225 and BSN 246, or equivalent.
Corequisites: None
Requisites: PSY 201, SCI 131, SCI 225, and BSN 215
Description: This course emphasizes the provision of professional nursing care for clients across the lifespan with acute medical conditions. The learners will build upon knowledge gained in the basic sciences and other prerequisite nursing courses. The course emphasizes decision-making skills, independent functioning, and a family-centered approach. The course will introduce the learner to the nursing care of acute clients. The course includes application to specific concepts, principles, and theories in various acute care settings.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 305 Distance 4 60               60
BSN 305 : Pharmacology for BMTC
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 4
Contact Hours: 60
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math; BSN 215 or equivalent.
Corequisites: None
Requisites: PSY 201, SCI 131, and SCI 225
Description: Overview of the principles of advanced nursing pharmacology, including major drug classifications and prototypes of commonly used medications. Principles of medication administration include aspects of best practice for safe, quality, patient-centered care. Central topics of the course include safety, quality improvement factors in the administration of medications, patient teaching, and variations encountered when administering medications to diverse patient populations across the lifespan.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 315  Distance 3 45               45
BSN 315 : Pharmacology II
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 3
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math; BSN 215 or equivalent.
Corequisites: None
Requisites: PSY 201, SCI 131, and SCI 225
Description: This course builds upon the concepts introduced in BSN 215, encompassing safe drug administration to clients across the health continuum. This course focuses on the role of the registered professional nurse as a provider of culturally competent client-centered care, education and leadership skills, and advocacy for clients with complex needs and selected diagnoses in pharmacological treatment. Using the nursing process as a guide, the learner integrates previous learning with current, expanded learning to analyze the therapeutic use of drugs and assist the patient in using them safely.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 325  Distance 4 52.5             22.5 75
BSN 325 : Population-Based Chronic Illness and Health Promotion
Delivery Modality: Blended
Semester Credits: 4
Contact Hours: 75
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour (This course includes a practice-based direct focused client care experiential learning project which requires twenty-two point five (22.5) tracked clock hours to receive credit for the course).
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math; and BSN 246.
Corequisites: None
Requisites: MAT 220, PSY 201, SCI 131, and SCI 225
Description: This course introduces concepts of community health nursing using a population-focused nursing process. The course emphasizes health promotion, risk reduction, and disease management in selected community settings. The course focuses on theory-based nursing care of aggregates, communities, and vulnerable populations in a global, multicultural society. The course introduces learners to public health concepts as well as characteristics of community health nursing. The course also emphasizes community assessment process and the development of nursing strategies to assist multi-problem families, while considering health on a continuum and throughout the lifespan. In addition, the course will explore the nurse’s role on the community health team and give an understanding of healthcare needs of different cultural groups. Note: Though not classified as “direct focused client care experiential learning” contact hours in the curriculum plan, the RN-to-BSN Track requires twenty-two point five (22.5) tracked practice-based direct focused client care experiential learning project hours to earn the academic credit for BSN 325.

Note: Though not classified as “direct focused client care experiential learning” contact hours in the curriculum plan, the RN-to-BSN Program requires twenty-two point five (22.5) tracked practice-based direct focused client care experiential learning project hours to earn the academic credit for BSN 325.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 335  Distance 2 30               30
BSN 335 : Concepts of Professionalism, Management, and Leadership
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 2
Contact Hours: 30
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course will explore professionalism, management and leadership concepts, issues, roles, and functions as applied to the role of the professional nurse in various healthcare settings. The course will emphasize development in the roles of problem solver, change agent and leader. The course focuses on evidence-based leadership, management skills, and competencies needed by professional nurses to work productively in inter-professional teams. Learners will analyze current best practices related to leadership roles, communication, teamwork and collaboration, quality improvement, and culturally competent client-centered care. The course will emphasize legal and ethical issues related to leadership and professionalism.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 346  Blended 7 44.5 4 4 15 67.5 67.5     202.5
BSN 346 : Concepts of Nursing III
Delivery Modality: Blended
Semester Credits: 7
Contact Hours: 202.5
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English; and three (3) semester credits in college-level math; BSN 246 and BSN 266.
Corequisites: None
Requisites: BSN 305 or BSN 315
Description: This course focuses on providing advanced chronic care for clients at all stages in life and with several types of physiological and psychological processes. The course also explores end-of-life issues related to chronic illness. Learners will synthesize knowledge from earlier courses related to health promotion and prevention and move toward providing client-centered care for people suffering from complex chronic illnesses. Learners will explore the aging process and discuss end-of-life issues as well as explore co-morbidities while managing health outcomes for chronic care patients, along with psychological conditions. Direct focused client care experiential learning gives learners the opportunity to gain experience with many of these more complex chronic conditions.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 355 Distance 1 15               15
BSN 355 : Capstone Proposal
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 1
Contact Hours: 15
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math; and BSN 246.
Corequisites: None
Requisites: PSY 201, SCI 131, and SCI 225
Description: This course is a preparatory proposal course for BSN 485: Capstone Leadership, which will be taken the last academic semester of the BSN Program. Learners will be completing a capstone project in the BSN Program during that final academic semester, but the ideas, proposal, and approval for this project will come to fruition in this Capstone Proposal course. Learners will learn about vision, creativity, and planning as it relates to leadership in nursing. They will propose a plan for a capstone project and explain how the plan will be carried out. This course will discuss some basic principles related to leadership and the future of nursing.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 366  Blended 7 53 4 3 15 45 45   22.5 187.5
BSN 366 : Concepts of Nursing IV
Delivery Modality: Blended
Semester Credits: 7
Contact Hours: 187.5
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math; BSN 266 and BSN 346.
Corequisites: None
Requisites: BSN 305 or BSN 315
Description: This course emphasizes the provision of professional nursing care for clients across the lifespan with acute, complex medical conditions. The learners will build upon knowledge gained in the Acute Care I course (BSN 266). The course greatly emphasizes acute care related to several different pathophysiological processes and end-of-life issues. The course includes application to specific concepts, principles, and theories in various acute care settings. The course will emphasize decision-making skills and independent functioning.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 375 Distance 2 30               30
BSN 375 : Advanced Issues in Cognition
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 2
Contact Hours: 30
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math; and BSN 266.
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course focuses on advanced principles and concepts related to cognition and psychiatric nursing, emphasizing the roles and functions of the nurse in meeting the needs of individuals, families, groups, and communities who are experiencing issues in cognitive functioning. Learners will build upon concepts of cognition they learned in their associate degree programs and advance their thinking skills to the analysis, synthesis, and evaluation levels. The course will emphasize the nurse’s ability to communicate, lead, apply the nursing process, and clinically judge situations related to cognition and psychiatric nursing.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 395  Blended 5 30           135   165
BSN 395 : Entry into Professional Nursing Practice
Delivery Modality: Blended
Semester Credits: 5
Contact Hours: 165
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: BSN 335 and BSN 366
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course focuses on the role transition of the professional nurse as a provider of client-centered care, leader in the profession, manager of care, and member of the profession of nursing. The course will examine the elements of professional nursing practice as well as the role of the professional nurse within the global health care delivery system. Learners will participate in licensure preparation through standardized assessments and individualized remediation. Learners will participate in a clinical integrative practicum to experience the full spectrum of responsibilities and roles of the professional nurse. The course will discuss role expectations of the professional nurse and implement evidence-based guidelines for professional nursing practice.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 425  Distance 3 45               45
BSN 425 : Gerontological Nursing
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 3
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: BSN 346
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course examines the physical, psychological, sociocultural, and spiritual aspects of aging within the context of the family and society. The course will examine advanced theoretical concepts of aging in light of the nursing process. The course will present theories and concepts related to gerontology and nursing principles within the framework of critical thinking and caring. The focus is on health promotion through providing safe, evidence-based practice interventions, emphasizing the well and the vulnerable older adult population.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 435  Distance 3 45               45
BSN 435 : Scholarship and Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 3
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits in human anatomy and human physiology, and three (3) semester credits in college-level English, and three (3) semester credits in college-level math; and BSN 266.
Corequisites: None
Requisites: ENG 311, MAT 220, and BSN 355
Description: This course provides an introduction to the research process in the practice of nursing. Research in nursing is important to promote, maintain, and restore health, and to ensure quality and safety in nursing practice. Learners will examine the research process as a basis for how scientific nursing knowledge is obtained. The steps in the research process are identified, discussed, and will be implemented in conjunction with the Capstone Proposal course (BSN 355). The course will explore the use of nursing research in the development of therapeutic nursing interventions. Learners will learn to apply critical thinking skills to the evaluation of published nursing research for application to practice.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 445  Distance 3 45               45
BSN 445 : Concepts of Nursing in the Complex Patient
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 3
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: BSN 366 (BSN 445 may be taken concurrently with the BSN 366 Audit)
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course focuses on pathophysiologic concepts and nursing management essential to critical care and emergency nursing in complex patient settings. The course will address ethical, moral, and legal issues as well as specific considerations for various procedures and specialty services encountered in the critical care environment. Learners will learn to apply the nursing process with complex patient situations and prioritize nursing care for clients with multiple complex needs.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 465  Distance 3 45               45
BSN 465 : Decision Making in Nursing
Delivery Modality: Distance
Semester Credits: 3
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: BSN 366 (BSN 465 may be taken concurrently with the BSN 366 Audit)
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: The purpose of this course is to aid nurses in making decisions, using ethical, political, legal, cultural, spiritual, clinical, and other considerations as part of the decision-making process. The course will emphasize ethical decision-making in nursing practice. Nurses are required to make decisions in every aspect of practice, and need to have a foundation of knowledge, values, and ethics which will promote client-centered care in multiple nursing settings. An accurate understanding of policy and ethics in the decision-making process is vital for every practicing nurse.

 

Course Number Delivery Modality Semester Credits Didactic Learning Remote Experiential Learning Total
  CBT ISBP VCBP ISB VCBC DFC IP AFE  
BSN 485  Distance 2 15             45 60
BSN 485 : Capstone Leadership
Delivery Modality: Blended
Semester Credits: 2
Contact Hours: 60
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour (This course includes a clinical practice-based project which requires 45 tracked clock hours to receive credit for the course).
Typically Offered:
Prerequisites: BSN 355 and BSN 435
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course is a follow-up course to BSN 355: Capstone Proposal, which was taken the first or second semester of the BSN Program. In this course, learners will be completing the capstone project they proposed in BSN 355. Learners will apply their learning about vision, creativity, and planning as it relates to leadership in nursing. They will complete a capstone project.

 

 

Pre-Dispute Arbitration and Class Action Waiver Disclosure

Nightingale College seeks to resolve disputes or claims between any learner and the College in an efficient, cost-effective, and timely manner. A learner who enrolls at Nightingale College agrees, as a condition of their enrollment, to resolve any dispute through mandatory arbitration that shall not be adjudicated as a class action or a consolidated class arbitration proceeding. However, the College cannot require a learner loan borrower to participate in arbitration or any internal dispute resolution process offered by the institution prior to filing a borrower defense to repayment application with the U.S. Department of Education pursuant to 34 CFR 685.206(e); the College cannot, in any way, require learners to limit, relinquish, or waive their ability to pursue filing a borrower defense claim, pursuant to 34 CFR 685.206(e) at any time; and any arbitration, required by a pre-dispute arbitration agreement, tolls the limitations period for filing a borrower defense to repayment application pursuant to 34 CFR 685.206(e)(6)(ii). 

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