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General Education Courses

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ENG 120 : English Composition
Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: The course helps learners develop quality writing skills by explaining and identifying the steps involved in the writing process. Six (6) types of writing are examined: argumentative, compare/contrast, descriptive, narrative, persuasive, and summary. Learners will write a minimum of twenty (20) pages as a requirement for the course. The importance of proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling is highlighted, as emphasis is placed on editing and revising pieces of writing. Learners also learn proper research techniques, utilizing the American Psychological Association (APA) style.
HUM 110 : Western Civilization I
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course introduces civilization from pre-history to the early modern era. Western Civilization refers to the civilization that began in the ancient Near East and then developed primarily in Europe, northern Africa, and the westernmost edges of Asia. Learners will concentrate on several major themes: the rise and fall of the ancient and classical civilizations that were forerunners to the rise of the West, the cultural legacy of these civilizations, the changing role of religion in society and changes in religion itself, and the development of political institutions. Topics include ancient Greece, Rome, and Christian institutions of the Middle Ages and the emergence of national monarchies in western Europe.
MAT 100 : College Algebra
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course provides knowledge of Intermediate Algebra and its applications. The course emphasizes algebraic techniques with polynomials, rational expressions, exponents, radical expressions and equations, factoring, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, logarithmic and exponential functions, and solving systems of two or more linear equations.
MAT 220 : Introduction to Statistics
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: MAT 100 or equivalent
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: In this course, learners will examine the properties behind the basic concepts of probability and statistics and focus on applications of statistical knowledge. Learners will learn how statistics and probability work together. The subject of statistics involves the study of methods for collecting, summarizing, and interpreting data. Learners will learn how to understand the basics of drawing statistical conclusions. This course will begin with descriptive statistics and the foundation of statistics, then move to probability and random distributions, the latter of which enables statisticians to work with several aspects of random events and their applications. Finally, learners will examine several ways to investigate the relationships between various characteristics of data.
PSY 201 : Introduction to Psychology
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course is designed to give the learner a basic understanding of the psychology of human behavior. The learner will be given exposure to the concepts, terminology, principles, and theories that comprise an introductory course in psychology. Topics covered will synthesize the broad range of knowledge about psychology, emphasize research methodology, encourage critical thinking, and convey a multicultural approach that respects human diversity and individual differences.
SCI 220 : Human Anatomy with Intervention Skill-Based (ISB) Experiential Learning
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction, Virtual ISB Instruction)
Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 ISB)
Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 ISB)
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: SCI 221 (or equivalent): Human Physiology with Intervention Skill- Based (ISB) Experiential Learning
Requisites: None
Description: In conjunction with SCI 221: Human Physiology, this course provides a comprehensive look at the human body’s anatomy and functions. Topics include organization of the body, characteristics of life, and anatomical terminology. The course examines skin, skeletal system, muscles, digestive, urinary, lymphatic, circulatory, reproductive, and nervous systems. The course also presents sensory organs and the endocrine system. This course contains an intervention skill-based experiential learning component (one [1] credit hour), where learners will practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (three [3] semester credits) of the course.
SCI 221 : Human Physiology with Intervention Skill-Based (ISB) Experiential Learning
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction, Virtual ISB Instruction)
Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 ISB)
Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 ISB)
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: SCI 220 (or equivalent): Human Anatomy with Intervention Skill-Based (ISB) Experiential Learning
Requisites: None
Description: In conjunction with SCI 220: Human Anatomy, this course examines major parts of the body and how they work independently as well as together. The course also explains principles related to nutrition, metabolism, body fluid balances, and aging. The course also presents how the body maintains homeostasis, the relationship of chemistry to human anatomy and physiology, and cell function and division. The course discusses several diseases and disorders as well as their causes, detection, and treatment. This course contains an intervention skill-based experiential learning component (one [1] credit hour), where learners will practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (three [3] semester credits) of the course.
SCI 225 : Pathophysiology
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: Minimum eight (8) semester credits of human anatomy and human physiology
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course describes the general principles of disease, then presents information dealing with specific disorders of body systems or individual organs. The purpose of this course is to provide the learner with basic understanding of pathophysiology as a change from normal physiological functioning of the various systems of the human body. The course is based on illness and disease within a systems framework across the lifespan. This course emphasizes select illnesses most often encountered by health professionals. The course focuses on critical thinking used to analyze the signs and symptoms based on the pathophysiology of these conditions.
SOC 220 : Introduction to Sociology
Delivery Modality: Distance (Online Didactic Instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)
Contact Hours: 45
Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer (Subject to Enrollment)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
Requisites: None
Description: This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, learners should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies.

 

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