MSN Program Curriculum

MSN Program Curriculum

The essentials of Master’s Education in Nursing provides an important framework for designing and assessing Master-level nursing education. The original purpose of the essentials is to “delineate the outcomes expected of all graduates of master’s nursing programs” (AACN, 2011). Because professional nursing practice in all settings requires consideration of the individual, family, community, and population as client, these outcomes are essential to Master’s nursing education offered.

  • Essential I: Background for Practice from Sciences and Humanities 
  • Essential II: Organizational and Systems Leadership 
  • Essential III: Quality Improvement and Safety
  • Essential IV: Translating and Integrating Scholarship into Practice
  • Essential V: Informatics and Healthcare Technologies
  • Essential VI: Health Policy and Advocacy
  • Essential VII: Interprofessional Collaboration for Improving Patient and Population Health Outcomes 
  • Essential VIII: Clinical Prevention and Population Health for Improving Health
  • Essential IX: Master’s-Level Nursing Practice

The MSNEd Program consists of fifteen (15) graduate-division nursing core courses delivered over five (5) academic semesters and eighty (80) academic weeks, for a total of forty (40) semester credits. There are 540 didactic and 180 integrative practicum contact hours total. The MSNEd Program does not have any experiential learning contact hours assigned. However, the Program requires the completion of educator- based learning project/practicum. The Curriculum Plan table presented below represents a sample curriculum plan for learners.

MSNEd Program Sample Curriculum Plan

Course NumberDelivery ModalitySemester CreditsContact Hours
Didactic Learning
TheoryFETotal
Semester 1
MSN 500Distance23030
MSN 505Distance23030
MSN 510Distance23030
MSN 515Distance23030
Total8120120
Semester 2
MSN 520Distance34545
MSN 530Distance34545
MSN 540Distance23020
Total8120110
Semester 3
MSN 550Distance34545
MSN 560Distance34545
MSN 570Distance34545
Total9135135
Semester 4
MSN 620Distance34545
MSN 640Distance34545
MSN 660Distance34545
Total9135135
Semester 5
MSN 670Distance4180180
MSN 680Distance23030
Total630180210
MSNEd Degree Total40540180710
Field Experience (FE): Provides opportunity for the learner to apply all elements of prior learning in academic settings, while beginning the transition into the nurse educator role.  The learner integrates knowledge, clinical reasoning, and program competencies while implementing best teaching practices and assimilating into the nurse educator role in an academic environment.  The learner works directly with a Master-prepared nurse educator preceptor to incorporate evidence-based strategies into a comprehensive activity or teaching plan designed to engage learners in active learning and implemented to meet mutually determined outcomes.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Table

Total Credits AttemptedFinancial Aid Warning or Probation if CGPA is belowFinancial Aid Warning or Probation if course completion rate is below
1-82.067%
9-162.067%
17-242.067%
25-322.067%
33-402.067%

MSNEd Course Descriptions

General Education Course Descriptions

ENG 120: English Composition 

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: The course helps learners develop quality writing skills by explaining and identifying the steps involved in the writing process. Six types of writing are examined: argumentative, compare/contrast, descriptive, narrative, persuasive, and summary. Learners will write a minimum of 20 pages as a requirement for the course. The importance of proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling is highlighted, as emphasis is placed on editing and revising pieces of writing. Learners also learn proper research techniques, utilizing the American Psychological Association (APA) style.

HUM 110: Western Civilization I

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Summer

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course introduces civilization from pre-history to the early modern era. Western Civilization refers to the civilization that began in the ancient Near East and then developed primarily in Europe, northern Africa and the westernmost edges of Asia. Learners will concentrate on several major themes: the rise and fall of the ancient and classical civilizations that were forerunners to the rise of the West, the cultural legacy of these civilizations, the changing role of religion in society and changes in religion itself, and the development of political institutions. Topics include ancient Greece, Rome, and Christian institutions of the Middle Ages and the emergence of national monarchies in western Europe.

MAT 100: Intermediate Algebra

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course provides knowledge of Intermediate Algebra and its applications. Emphasis is placed on algebraic techniques with polynomials, rational expressions, exponents, radical expressions and equations, factoring, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, logarithmic and exponential functions, and solving systems of two or more linear equations.

PSY 201: Introduction to Psychology

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course is designed to give the learner a basic understanding of the psychology of human behavior. The learner will be given exposure to the concepts, terminology, principles, and theories that comprise an introductory course in psychology. Topics covered are to synthesize the broad range of knowledge about psychology, to emphasize research methodology, to encourage critical thinking, and to convey a multicultural approach that respects human diversity and individual differences.

SCI 220: Human Anatomy with Lab 

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction, virtual lab)

Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 Lab)

Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 Lab)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: SCI 221 (or equivalent): Human Physiology with Lab

Description: In conjunction with SCI 220: Human Physiology, this course provides a comprehensive look at the human body’s anatomy and functions. Topics include organization of the body, characteristics of life, and anatomical terminology. The skin, skeletal system, muscles, digestive, urinary, lymphatic, circulatory, reproductive, and nervous systems are examined. Sensory organs and the endocrine system are also presented. This course contains a lab component (1 credit hour), where learners will be able to practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (3 semester credits) of the class.

SCI 221: Human Physiology with Lab

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction, virtual lab)

Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 Lab)

Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 Lab)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: SCI 220 (or equivalent): Human Anatomy with Lab

Description: In conjunction with SCI 220: Human Anatomy, this course examines major parts of the body and how they work independently as well as together. Also explained are principles related to nutrition, metabolism, body fluid balances, and aging. Also presented are how the body maintains homeostasis, the relationship of chemistry to human anatomy and physiology, and cell function and division. Several diseases and disorders are discussed as well as the cause, detection, and treatment of them. This course contains a lab component (1 credit hour), where learners will be able to practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (3 semester credits) of the class.

SCI 225: Pathophysiology

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

Prerequisites: Minimum six (6) semester credits of Human Anatomy and Human Physiology

Corequisites: None

Description: This course describes the general principles of disease then presents information dealing with specific disorders of body systems or individual organs. The purpose of this course is to provide the learner with basic understanding of pathophysiology as a change from normal physiological functioning of the various systems of the human body. The course is based on illness and disease within a systems framework across the lifespan. Emphasis is put on select illnesses most often encountered by health professionals. The course focuses on critical thinking used to analyze the signs and symptoms based on the pathophysiology of these conditions.

SOC 220: Introduction to Sociology

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, learners should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies.

Upper-Division General Education Course Descriptions

ANT 300: Cultural Anthropology

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Spring

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course provides a solid introduction for learners who are new to the branch of cultural anthropology. Learners are presented with all the basic information pertinent to the field. The topics discussed include relevant anthropological theories, ethnocentrism and culture, language and communication, economic and political systems, kinship and descent, marriage and family, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, religion and belief systems, the effects of colonialism and industrialization, and globalization.

COM 301: Oral Communication

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course in speech is designed to develop each learner’s ability to communicate effectively in his or her academic, business, and personal lives. An overview of various models of communication are covered, alongside discussion of the benefits and elements of effective communication processes. Both verbal and nonverbal communication are discussed; emphasis is placed on development and presentation of a variety of speech types including informative, persuasive, and special occasion.

ENG 302: Technical Writing II

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 1 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 15

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall 2015

Prerequisites: ENG 301 or equivalent

Corequisites: NUR 420

Description: This course is the second out of the 3-course technical writing series (ENG 301, ENG 302, and ENG 303). Throughout the 3-course series, learners will receive an overview of commonly encountered professional genres such as memos, reports, journal articles, and grant proposals. Learners gain practice writing in these genres, with an emphasis on clarity and concision. They develop more sophisticated research skills and gain experience in communicating specialized information to non-specialist readers. Finally, they are exposed to the range of professional writing careers as they explore writing on both theoretical and practical planes through consideration of audience as well as wider professional, social, and cultural contexts. In ENG 302: Technical Writing II, learners will build upon what they learned in ENG 301 and will be given writing assignments that coincide with the second academic semester RN-to-BSN nursing courses.

ENG 303: Technical Writing III

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 1 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 15

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall 2015 and Spring 2016

Prerequisites: ENG 301 and ENG 302, or equivalent

Corequisites: NUR 490

Description: This is the third of the 3-course technical writing series (ENG 301, ENG 302, and ENG 303). Throughout the 3-course series, learners will receive an overview of commonly encountered professional genres such as memos, reports, journal articles, and grant proposals. Learners gain practice writing in these genres, with an emphasis on clarity and concision. They develop more sophisticated research skills and gain experience in communicating specialized information to nonspecialist readers. Finally, they are exposed to the range of professional writing careers as they explore writing on both theoretical and practical planes through consideration of audience as well as wider professional, social, and cultural contexts. In ENG 303: Technical Writing III, learners will build upon what they learned in ENG 301 and ENG 302, and will be given writing assignments that coincide with the third academic semester RN-to-BSN nursing courses.

ENG 310: Technical Writing

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

Prerequisites: ENG 120 or equivalent

Corequisites: BSN 355 and BSN 435

Description: In this course, learners receive an overview of commonly encountered professional genres such as memos, reports, journal articles, and grant proposals. Learners gain practice writing in these genres, with an emphasis on clarity and concision. They develop more sophisticated research skills and gain experience in communicating specialized information to non-specialist readers. Finally, learners are exposed to the range of professional writing careers as they explore writing on both theoretical and practical planes through consideration of audience as well as wider professional, social, and cultural contexts.

HUM 300: Introduction to Philosophy

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Spring

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course is a critical introduction to the field of philosophical inquiry. After defining philosophy and identifying the major fields of philosophical study, the course examines the history of Western thought, from the famous Greek philosophers up to the cutting-edge intellectuals of today. The course then dives into various thematic topics, including metaphysics, epistemology, free will and determinism, evil and the existence of God, personal identity, ethical values, and political philosophy. The course concludes with an analysis of different perspectives, including Eastern philosophies, and postcolonial thought.

MAT 320: Introduction to Statistics

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

Prerequisites: MAT 100 or equivalent

Corequisites: None

Description: In this course, learners will look at the properties behind the basic concepts of probability and statistics and focus on applications of statistical knowledge. Learners will learn about how statistics and probability work together. The subject of statistics involves the study of methods for collecting, summarizing, and interpreting data. Learners will learn how to understand the basics of drawing statistical conclusions. This course will begin with descriptive statistics and the foundation of statistics, move on to probability and random distributions, the latter of which enables statisticians to work with several aspects of random events and their applications. Finally, learners will examine a number of ways to investigate the relationships between various characteristics of data.

General Electives Course Descriptions

SCI 131: Introduction to Nutrition

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Summer

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course will provide an understanding of basic nutrition science. Learners will become familiar with the principles of diet planning, government standards, and food labeling. They will also be instructed about the biological functions and food sources of each nutrient, energy balance, weight management, physical activity, the role of nutrition in chronic disease development, nutrition through the life cycle, and food safety issues.

SCI 251: Microbiology with Intervention Skill Based (ISB) Experiential Learning

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction, Virtual ISB Instruction)

Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 ISB)

Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 ISB)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Fall

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course is designed to teach microbiology as it applies to the health care field. The course will explore pathogenic microorganisms and their role in human disease, human immunology, symptoms and treatment of microbial infection, and preventative measures against microbial infection. This course contains an intervention skill-based experiential learning component (1 credit hour), where learners will be able to practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (3 semester credits) of the class.

ENG 320: Creative Writing 

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Summer

Prerequisites: ENG 120

Corequisites: None

Description: This course introduces learners to the written formats of creative fiction and creative non-fiction, providing an overview of the creative writing process. Assignments will cover a wide variety of formats, including those of prose writing, poetry writing, and script writing. Through assigned readings, weekly writing prompts, and class critiques, learners will develop their sense of narrative structure, traditional plot structure, audience engagement, and standard manuscript style. Writing skills such as revision techniques, point-of-view, and theme will be explored, as will the importance of close-reading for editing and analysis purposes.

PSY 300: Human Development 

Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)

Contact Hours: 45

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Typically Offered: Summer

Prerequisites: PSY 201 or Equivalent

Corequisites: None

Description: This course is designed to give learners a broad overview of the field of human development. Covering the entire human lifespan, from conception to death, this course explores concepts, terminology, principles, and theories that comprise an introductory course in human development. Biological, cognitive, and emotional growth and development are examined within each developmental stage. Grief and bereavement and self-care for the caregiver will also be explored. Current research methods and cultural influences through the lifespan are explored and applied.

Master of Science in Nursing Education Core Course Descriptions

MSN 500: Clinical Prevention: Assessment & Planning

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 2 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 30 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course is a study of program planning processes for high risk and underserved aggregates. Graduate learners will explore methods of population-focused health assessment are emphasized for health promotion, disease prevention and chronic conditions management.

MSN 505: Professional Awareness in Modern Nursing

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 2 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 30 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: Our professional presence in therapeutic settings can support or inhibit well-being not only in patients, but also in the rest of the health care team, in the family and support system of the patients, and in the health care organization. This course will help the graduate learner manage this impact by recognizing situations and practices that support a positive environment and cultivating actions and responses to achieve and maintain this environment. The growth of self-knowledge will expand nurses’ ability to direct influence in ways that are intended rather than in random or destructive ways.

MSN 510: Healthcare Policy and Global Health Trends

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 2 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 30 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: Social, political, and economic factors influence policies that impact health outcomes in communities, nationally and globally. Nurse leaders need to understand the determinants of health as well as how legal and regulatory processes, healthcare finances, research, the role of professional organizations, and special interest groups/lobbyists impact health outcomes. This course provides a framework for understanding the organization of healthcare delivery and financing systems in the U.S. and other nations. It addresses how policies are made and factors that influence policies at local, national, and global levels that impact health/wellness and the nursing profession. The roles of values, ethical theories, stakeholder interests, research, and recent legislation related to health policy and health outcomes will be explored. The graduate learner will gain expertise in effecting change through active participation in influencing or developing policies that impact health.

MSN 515: Healthcare Statistics

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 2 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 30 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course focuses on upon the application of statistical methods and data analysis in the healthcare professions related to evidence-based practice.

MSN 520: Research Methods and Applications in Nursing

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 45 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course explores the methodology and application of nursing research and its relevancy to nursing education, nursing practice, and the learner’s specialty focus area. Emphasis is on research design, implementation and application of research. The graduate learner will also explore evidence-based practice models, quality improvement models, and grading levels of evidence.

MSN 530: Advanced Nursing Informatics and Technological Applications

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 45 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course examines a variety of informatics theories, models, and issues within complex healthcare systems. Graduate learners will examine complementary roles of master’s level-prepared nursing information technology professionals, including informaticists and quality officers. Content is directed toward assisting the student to understand system planning, analysis, implementation and evaluation. Learners will analyze current and emerging technologies; data management; ethical legal and regulatory best-practice evidence; and bio-health informatics using decision-making support systems at the point of care.

MSN 540: Systems Leadership and Innovation

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 2 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 30 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course explores the foundations of leadership and system innovation and develop the necessary skills to lead change and to create evidence on where change is most needed, how innovation can be developed and implemented and how to systematically assess the impact of change on all aspects of the health system.

MSN 550: Teaching Pathophysiology Across the Lifespan

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 45 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course provides the opportunity to acquire advanced knowledge and skills in the therapeutic use of pharmacologic agents, herbals, and supplements. Graduate learners will explore the pathophysiology of major health problems and the effects of culture, ethnicity, age, pregnancy, gender, healthcare setting, and funding will be examined. Emphasis on the concepts for teaching pathophysiology as nursing-related measures for health promotion, disease prevention, and chronic disease management for diverse populations across the lifespan.

MSN 560: Teaching Advanced Assessment Across the Lifespan

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 45 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course emphasizes the transfer of knowledge to clinical practice as graduate learners apply teaching-learning theory and assessment techniques to the healthcare of clients of all ages and the education of professional caregivers.  Analysis and synthesis of assessment findings are related to relevant client history, cultural and psychosocial client characteristics, normal anatomy and physiology, and normal growth and development.

MSN 580: Teaching Pharmacology across the Lifespan

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 45 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course provides the opportunity to acquire advanced knowledge and skills
in the therapeutic use of pharmacologic agents, herbals, and supplements. The graduate learner will explore the pharmacologic treatment of major health problems and examine the principles of pharmacogenomics. The effects of culture, ethnicity, age, pregnancy, gender, healthcare setting, and funding of pharmacologic therapy will be examined. Emphasis on the concepts for teaching pharmacology as nursing-related measures for health promotion, disease prevention, and chronic disease management for diverse populations across the lifespan.

MSN 620: Adult Education and Online Learning

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 45 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course examines the contemporary issues of nursing education. Graduate learners will explore how changes in the economy, advancements in science, and the explosion of technology have created a paradigm shift in nursing education. Learners will further explore the role of the educator and the application of innovative education strategies. While traditional contexts for learning are included, students will focus on modern technology and trends in adult nursing education and online learning. A focus on andragogy and the adult learner is an important element of this course.

MSN 640: Curriculum & Instruction in Nursing

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 45 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course is an examination of the philosophical and historical influences in nursing education within a contemporary context for curricula development. Graduate learners will explore curriculum development, educational philosophy, theories and models, instruction and evaluation, as well as e-learning, simulations, and current technology in nursing education. Pedagogical frameworks for designing and implementing instructional experiences are used to develop curricular objectives, select and organize content, and plan program evaluation strategies.

MSN 660: Teaching Methodology in Nursing

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 45 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: None

Corequisites: None

Description: This course is an examination of role development and practical methods for effective teaching. The selection, application, and evaluation of teaching tools and strategies in the context of health education, continuing education, staff development; classroom and clinical instruction is examined.

MSN 670: Nursing Education Field Experience

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 4 (Integrative Practicum)

Contact Hours: 180 (Integrative Practicum)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: MSN 620, MSN 640, and MSN 660

Corequisites: MSN 680

Description: This course is one (1) of the final two (2) courses in the MSNEd Program. Learners work in this course concurrently with MSN 680: Nursing Education Capstone course to complete a program summative project to demonstrate achievement of course and program outcomes. The Nursing Education Field Experience provides the graduate learner with an opportunity to work collaboratively within the organization where employed to address an identified nursing problem, need, or gap in current practices. Learners then work to promote a practice change, quality improvement, or innovation that is based on the existing evidence and best practices.

MSN 680: Nursing Education Capstone

Delivery Modality: Online (Online Didactic Instruction)

Semester Credits: 2 (Didactic Only)

Contact Hours: 30 (Didactic Contact)

Outside Preparation: An average of three (3) hours per week for every didactic credit hour

Prerequisites: MSN 620, MSN 640, and MSN 660

Corequisites: MSN 670

Description: This course is one (1) of the final two (2) courses in the MSNEd Program. Learners work in this course concurrently with MSN 670: Nursing Education Field Experience course to complete a program summative project to demonstrate achievement of course and program outcomes. The capstone course is a scholarly project that addresses an issue, need, gap or opportunity resulting from an identified in nursing education or health care need. The capstone project provides the opportunity for the graduate learner to demonstrate competency through design, application and evaluation of advanced nursing knowledge and higher-level leadership skills for ultimately improving health outcomes

MSNEd Program Outcomes

MSNEd Program Outcomes are aligned with the Institutional Effectiveness Plan and measure the degree to which the Program achieves its stated mission. For current MSNEd Program Outcomes benchmarks, see the MSNEd Program Outcomes Benchmarks Catalog Insert.

Program-Level Learner Outcomes

The MSNEd Program, in alignment with the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) 103

Standards for Accreditation of Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Programs, has identified Program outcomes, including Program-level learner outcomes and competencies, alumni outcomes, and faculty outcomes to evaluate the MSNEd Program effectiveness. The learner outcomes include program completion and employment rates, achievement of the College’s graduate general education goals, achievement of expected learner outcomes, satisfaction with courses and instruction, and satisfaction with overall program effectiveness.

At Program completion, as measured by evaluation activities throughout the Program, the graduate will

  1. Integrate the principles of patient-centered and culturally appropriate concepts of planning, delivering, and evaluating prevention and population care into nursing education and clinical practice care (Essential VIII).
  2. Integrate knowledge gained from nursing, bio-psychosocial fields, genetics/genomics, public health, quality improvement, and organizational sciences for the continual improvement of nursing education in diverse settings (Essential I).
  3. Analyze nursing research to facilitate the translation and integration of nursing scholarship into practice (Essential III and IV).
  4. Incorporate leadership, collaborative, and organizational skills into educational practice in order to emphasize ethical and critical decision-making, effective working relationships, and a system- perspective.
  5. Demonstrate role competency and leadership through the analysis, development and implementation of health policy. Advocate for policies that improve the health of the public and the profession of nursing (Essentials II and VI).
  6. Analyze nursing practice, legal, and ethical considerations of current communication and emerging healthcare technologies utilized in patient care and nursing education (Essential V).
  7. Integrate the principles of quality improvement and evaluation into the advanced nurse educator role (Essential III).
  8. Function as a member of inter/intra professional collaborative team for improving patient and population health outcomes (Essential VII).
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