Nightingale College is excited to introduce the 2015 commercials focusing on the College’s guiding principles of Confidence, Competence, and Compassion.

Are You Tough Enough to be a Confident Registered Nurse?

Are You Tough Enough to be a Competent Registered Nurse?

Are You Tough Enough to be a Compassionate Registered Nurse?

“I attended an NCLEX-RN conference in May of 2015 presented by Elsevier, an academic publishing company. During the conference, I learned many important concepts that can potentially help the learners here at Nightingale College. For example, many learners do not know that they should never skip a question on the exam because there is a 50 percent chance of answering the question correctly, or that the NCLEX-RN is written at a 10th grade reading level. If a learner struggles with reading comprehension, it can be beneficial to provide additional reading comprehension resources for the learner to access and use.

What May Cause a Learner to Fail the NCLEX-RN

Learners who postpone taking the NCLEX-RN are more likely to fail the exam. Learners should remember that they should take their NCLEX-RN within 30 days after graduation because the time that a learner graduates and takes the exam has an inverse correlation showing the chances of passing the exam may decrease over time.

Students who are either working full time or experience test anxiety are also at higher risk to fail the NCLEX-RN.

How Does Nightingale College Help

Nightingale College provides all learners the opportunity to attend a test taking skills workshop and a test anxiety workshop to improve success. Also, the college implements a more adaptive approach to testing by using question-styles that are commonly used on the NCLEX-RN (fill-in-the-blank, multiple choice, multiple response, hot spots, ordered responses, and so on) to help familiarize learners with questions that may be seen on the exam. The college maps the NCLEX-RN content to the college’s curriculum plan for each course to ensure the right content is available to our learners. Learners will also take standardized exams, such as the HESI, to assess their knowledge, and these exams have been linked to better results on the NCLEX-RN.

Nightingale College works together to guide learners to be successful and prepare them to provide safe, effective care for those in need.”

– Linda Benson (Curriculum Manager)

Give Back Day is a favorite among many Nightingale employees. Why? It’s a day strictly dedicated to serving the community and putting into practice the college’s Beyond Self value. Since its establishment, the college has sought out opportunities to improve the community. Whether helping the Boys and Girls Club of Ogden move or preparing one hundred sack lunches for the St. Anne’s Center, the college gathers together biannually to lend a helping hand to facilities and organizations in need. Nightingale College enjoys fulfilling their mission not only by providing quality nursing education, but by reaching out and acting on the desire to make a difference outside of the higher education and healthcare fields.

“At Nightingale, we focus on the health and well-being of others. If you can help people with their basic needs, they can then go out and focus on other things such as learning, finding employment and so on,” said Mikhail Shneyder, president and CEO of the college. “In addition, strengthening the health of the community also allows people to progress. We try to find projects that will allow for that. From the very founding of the company, we’ve had this notion of trying to make as big of an impact on the people of our community as possible.” (Quote from the Standard Examiner article.)

“We believe going out and serving others and having that desire to help others improves the overall morale of our employees, and that’s something we monitor closely here,” said Jonathan Tanner, director of admissions and marketing. “We hope our employees will always have that desire to get out and help those around them, not just twice a year, but always.” (Quote from the Standard Examiner article.)

The Ogden Weber Community Action Partnership (OWCAP) became the college’s Give Back Day focus to kick off 2015. Bright and early Thursday morning, Nightingale College employees threw on their matching Give Back Day tees and met at the OWCAP eager to get started on enhancing the appearance of the facility and assist in several of their preschool classrooms. With 40+ employees in attendance, the college was able to supply numerous volunteers to help in the different areas of the facility. Some tore carpet off of the walls of the main lobby, scrapped glue from the wall’s surface, then applied primer and paint. Some spent the day outside sprucing up the exterior’s landscape by planting flowers and tidying up the grounds. Some headed out back to clean and disinfect the playground. And, some devoted the day to spending time with the children enrolled in the preschool.

DSC_4812 DSC_4781 DSC_4657 DSC_4666 DSC_4676 DSC_4643

“Give Back Day is about people coming together and doing something good,” said Shneyder. “It’s the power of the community when we help others without expecting anything in return and the world becomes a little bit better through this labor of love.”

Nightingale College was honored to have the Standard Examiner cover their Give Back Day event, to read the Standard Examiner’s story click here.

Check out more of our Give Back Day photos on our Facebook page.

SAAM

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

Statistics show that on campus one in five women and one in sixteen men are sexually assaulted during their time in college (Krebs, Lindquist, Warner, Fisher, & Martin 2007). These numbers are alarmingly high. It is up to us to learn the signs of sexual assault, and what we can do to prevent it.

Nightingale College is supporting by raising awareness around campus, so look out for the teal ribbons as well as our sexual assault awareness corner in Classroom 1. We will also have several media posts where you can show your support.

Let’s all work together to educate and involve one another to create a safe campus and environment for students, faculty and staff.

Learn what it takes to be the X-Factor when it comes to taking the NCLEX exam.

Cover Letter

First impressions count in the job search, and that’s why a dynamite cover letter can mean the difference between success and failure in your healthcare job search. But what makes a dazzling healthcare cover letter? Several career experts share their advice.

Get to the Point

State the purpose of your letter in the first paragraph. Small talk is generally a waste of space.

“Most of the cover letters we do for clients are three paragraphs or so and fill less than a page,” says Shel Horowitz, Director of Accurate Writing & More in Hadley, Massachusetts.

Tailor Your Letter to the Reader

Focus on the needs of the specific healthcare organization, not on your own requirements as a job seeker, says Lorna Lindsey, Director of Academic Affairs for CompHealth, a healthcare recruiting and staffing firm based in Salt Lake City. Visit your potential healthcare employer’s Web site or read the company’s annual report to learn more about it, and then use your cover letter to demonstrate how your skills and experience can benefit the organization.

Maintain the Right Tone

A cover letter should be “businesslike, friendly and enthusiastic,” says Bill Frank, founder of CareerLab in Denver and author of 200 Letters for Job HuntersHealthcare professionals have the “opportunity to reveal their passion “through a cover letter, but the document “shouldn’t become too syrupy, or it loses its objectivity and professionalism.”

Make It Memorable

New healthcare graduates can make their cover letters stand out by personalizing their stories. If you decided to model your career after a healthcare professional that helped a family member, for example, tell that story rather than making the blander claim that you’ve always wanted to help people. “If your story is unique, it’s no longer a cliché,” Frank says.

Stay on Track

The best cover letters are direct and concise.  Don’t include a lot of unnecessary personal information.

Highlight Your Biggest Successes

Your healthcare cover letter shouldn’t just summarize your career or repeat the same information from your resume, according to Wendy Enelow, founder of the Career Masters Institute in Fresno, California. “You want it to highlight the successes and achievements of your career that are most related to the types of positions for which you are applying,” she says.

Use Power Phrases

Use strong action words to convey your healthcare experiences and illustrate your healthcare qualifications with phrases like “I have a strong background in” and “I have a talent for.  Don’t be shy about selling yourself since that’s the purpose of a cover letter.

Show Your Team Spirit

If you have room for a few extra sentences in your cover letter, emphasize your teamwork and communication skills. In this day and age, teamwork and communication are vitally important in almost every healthcare position, from the lowest to the highest paid individual.

Spice Up Your Writing

Effective cover letters are a little different from all the others but still straightforward, experts say. For example, the boring, traditional way to start a cover letter is: “I am writing in response to your advertisement for a nurse and have enclosed my resume for your review.” A better cover letter beginning could be: “Your ad on Monster for a nurse captured my attention and motivated me to learn more about this healthcare opportunity.” Then describe how your healthcare qualifications match the employer’s needs.

Follow Up

An unforgivable error some job seekers make is failing to follow up after promising to do so in a cover letter. If you write in your cover letter that you’ll call the letter recipient on a certain day or by a specific deadline, do it.

Don’t:

  • Provide salary information when it is not requested.
  • Address a letter recipient by anything other than his/her name. Avoid “Dear Sirs” at all costs
  • Write a canned, generic letter that looks like it was copied from a book.
  • Start the first paragraph and too many other sentences with “I.”
  • Make spelling errors and typos.
  • Hand write a cover letter.
  • Use shoddy paper, or paper that’s different from your resume paper.
  • Cram too much information into a small space.
  • Include irrelevant personal information or job experience.
  • Overstate your accomplishments or contradict your resume

– Author: Alan Drage (People Services, Director)

Seranor DeJesus“I’m writing to let you know about the very wonderful and educational experience I had at Salt Lake Regional Medical Center during my last two clinicals.  I should start by saying that the experience I had while working there for two days solidified all of my desires to become an ICU nurse.  I have had two clinical experiences, one on January 26th and the other on January 29th.  Both of the experiences were AWESOME, VERY EDUCATIONAL, and VERY REWARDING!!!  I apologize for the excessive use of capitalization, but it is the only way to get my point across about how much I enjoyed these two clinical experiences.

Let me start by saying the nurses in the ICU/Telemetry unit were so supportive.  I was assigned to a registered nurse, Mila, in the early morning hours on my first clinical at SLRMC.  My nurse had not arrived to the department yet, so another registered nurse offered to let me shadow her while I waited for Mila to arrive.  A couple of other nurses offered to let me assist/observe as they performed morning cares to patients in that critical environment.  After Mila arrived that morning, she immediately received report and started to work.  She let me perform so many of the clinical procedures/cares throughout the day, and I was surprised at how much I had learned in class, labs, SIMS, and from my instructors.  Mila tested my knowledge of medications, labs, and procedures, which was very helpful.  She gave me the opportunity to perform cares and administer medications, rather than just having me watch her all day.  It was a great first day, and I was super excited to share what I had learned during our post-conference.

The second clinical experience was just as wonderful as the first.  I was assigned to the ICU/Telemetry unit once again, but to a different nurse. Lauren arrived that morning, and immediately made me feel comfortable with her and the rest of the staff.  After her morning coffee, which I’m told is vital to working in the ICU, she received report.  We started with medications and cares, and again I was allowed to perform many of the cares and medication administrations I had learned at school.  The day went by so quickly that I lost track of time, and needed to be retrieved by my fellow students for post-conference. I can’t believe how much I have learned in the past 10 months, and I was thrilled to have the opportunity to put my newly-learned skills into practice.  Thanks again for everything you do in getting these awesome learning environments lined up for us students.”

Seranor DeJesus

As discussed last time in How to Manage Your Time in Nursing School, nursing students have a hard time juggling school, work, and personal time. And in order to have balance in your life, you need to find balance in your scheduling.

Challenge
Try this for the next week, look at your schedule, and find out what your scholarly plans look like. When are your classes? In what order are your assignments due? Do you have tests or quizzes coming up? If you need to, work in the reverse. For example, if you think you need to dedicate 4 hours to study for an exam that is coming up, plan on studying for an hour a day starting as early as 4 days leading up to the exam date. There is no need to study for 4 hours all in one day – you’ll wear yourself down by doing so.

Finding that Balance
It is ridiculous to think that you can go to work, school, and study without some leisure time. You need to allow yourself breaks, so that when you do get back to work, school, or studying you don’t go completely crazy. Allow yourself time to do what you want for at least an hour every so often. Your brain needs those breaks, so that you can retain more information when you study. Just remember, don’t over-do the leisure time. If you need to use a planner, phone, or computer for scheduling, do so. This will ease the stress of trying to figure out when you have time to do everything.

Staying Healthy
In college, the first thing that seems to go is sleep, and the lack of sleep is more damaging than you may realize. Lacking sleep can throw your mental, physical, and emotional health out of whack, and your stress levels will increase. Also, keep up on eating healthy and staying hydrated. Just a hint: The more colorful your plate is when you are eating, chances are the healthier it is. Take time to exercise 2-3 days a week for at least half an hour. Your health is the most important thing to worry about when it comes to life, so making it a priority will benefit you in more ways than one.

Inside Glimpse from a Nightingale Student
We asked our student ambassadors for their intake on time management, and this is what Ashely D. responded:

“I spend about 30-35 hours a week studying. I think the recommended time is 2 hours of studying for every credit hour you have. I do not study every day, the way I plan my schedule is I work 12-14 hours Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and no studying. Then I work about 3-4 hours Tuesday and Thursday. I study Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday for long periods of time, but that is how I prefer to study. I do not benefit from studying for short periods of time every day. I am single and have no kids, so it is easier for me to work this way than it may be for others. I, also, seek out help from my fellow students, like we work together on study guides for exams so we can study from each other’s information rather than having to find all the information on my own. I also have help from my family and friends. For example, my dad comes over every week and does my lawn work.
I do not set a time limit on anything graded, I take however long it takes to finish the assignment and do the best I can. I prioritize my studies by order of due date. I do whatever is due first and worth the most points then move on from there. Usually discussion board posts do not take that long, so if I have a test coming up I study for that first then do the discussion boards last.

My job is very flexible because I set my own schedule, so I do have those open days (Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday) where I shift my schedule around to accommodate surprises. I think it is always best to try your hardest to do things ahead of when they are due that way when surprises arise you are not scrambling to figure out how you will work issues out. It’s always helpful to notify professors if you do have a surprise come up that is not school related to see if they will allow you extra time to turn in an assignment rather than tell them after the assignment has already been due.
It was recommended to me by ‘Mr. H’ to always have one day of rest where you look at nothing related to nursing. I do not think it is necessary to study everyday but at least set aside a little time every day to make sure you know what is coming up in the course, check canvas for updates, etc. Studying for long periods of time 4 times a week is what works best for me.”

 

Additional Sources
In addition, Nightingale College offers the Total Life Care (TLC) program and is available to assist in personal difficulties that might affect the quality of life. This program is a benefit to students and their families. They cover time and stress management, child care, home buying, college tuition, marriage and family struggles, etc. And if you still feel unsure about how to better manage your time, feel free to speak with our Student Services Department for more tips on how to manage your time.

Student Services may be contacted by phone at (801) 689-2160 and by email.

Daniel Jensen – Student Services Advisor, djensen@nightingale.edu

Amanda Shoemaker – Assistant, Student Services, ashoemaker@nightingale.edu

Happy Managing!

Author: Mackenzie Whitten (Administrative Assistant, Operations)

Nightingale College was invited to appear on Channel 4’s Good Things Utah. During the segment, Nightingale College’s CEO, Mikhail Shneyder, announced two major accomplishments:

#1 Nightingale’s nursing program has become a fully accredited nursing program through ACEN.

#2 Nightingale has announced its BSN program is starting.

The College was also recognized for being #3 in UTAH for first time pass rates on the NCLEX exam for ADN Programs. This is an outstanding accomplishment and shows the quality of education delivered by the College to its students. Watch it:

Nightingale College announced back in January that the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Program hosted a successful site visit for the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). ACEN site evaluators recommended the program for initial accreditation for a 5-year term. Members of Nightingale’s administration attended step 2, Evaluation Review Panel (ERP), and have reported the College passed stage 2! The final step, the Board of Commissioners Meeting, July 10 – 11, 2014, will take place in Atlanta, Georgia. The College will receive the final decision letter in mid-August 2014.

Nightingale College thanks all its staff, students, graduates, and community partners that contributed to the ongoing success of the nursing program!

Every year, National Nurses Week focuses attention on the diverse ways America’s 3.1 million registered nurses work to save lives and to improve the health of millions of individuals. This year, the American Nurses Association (ANA) has selected “Nurses Leading the Way” as the theme for 2014.

Annually, National Nurses Week begins on May 6, marked as RN Recognition Day, and ends on May 12, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, founder of nursing as a modern profession. Traditionally, National Nurses Week is devoted to highlighting the diverse ways in which registered nurses, who comprise the largest health care profession, are working to improve health care. During this week, Nightingale College honors its registered nurse graduates, current RN nursing students, and all nurses that walk in the footsteps of Florence Nightingale. Florence truly lit up the path for our success with her unwavering values.

Today and always, Nightingale College and its graduates walk in her footsteps of excellence, integrity, respecting humanity, continuous improvement, collaboration and accountability, and going beyond self.

Nightingale College understands the role RNs play in the ongoing improvement and transformation of health care systems of this great nation. ANA reports, “The Affordable Care Act and the Institute of medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing report places nurses at the center of health care transformation in the United States.” Nightingale College invites RNs everywhere to positively influence the quality of care and overall performance of the health care system to which they belong.

Happy nurses week 2014!

Nightingale College is proud to announce that the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Program hosted a successful site visit for the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). ACEN site evaluators recommended the program for initial accreditation for a 5-year term. The remaining 2 tiers in the initial accreditation process are the Evaluation Review Panel (ERP), June 2 – 6, 2014, and the Board of Commissioners Meeting, July 10 – 11, 2014, both of which will take place in Atlanta, Georgia. The College will receive the final decision letter in mid-August 2014.

Nightingale College thanks all its staff, students, graduates, and community partners that contributed to this momentous event!

What you must know about accreditation?

There are important facts to know and a few questions to consider prior to selecting which accredited college to attend. First, there are two types of accreditation that an institution of higher learning can obtain; one is known as “institutional” and the other is “specialized” or “programmatic”. Institutional accreditation refers to the entire institution, meaning all parts of that institution are positively contributing to the overall objectives and mission. Specialized or programmatic accreditation refers to a specific program and its measured outcomes. In the U.S., higher education accreditation is voluntary and is granted through lengthy and arduous peer-review processes driven by accrediting agencies. Often, while in the process of obtaining initial accreditation, educational institutions and programs spend several years in “candidacy,” a status granted to qualified applicants.

The U.S. Department of Education does not accredit educational institutions or programs directly, but the Secretary of Education publishes

a list of all recognized accrediting agencies that have been determined to be reliable through a review process as long and laborious as obtaining and maintaining accreditation itself. Although not mandatory, accreditation serves as a pass to institutional and programmatic eligibility for Title IV Federal Student Aid programs, such as Pell Grants and Direct Loans, while guiding institutions and programs to meet certain quality standards and continuously improve.

The two types of institutional accrediting bodies are Regional and National. Finding a school that is accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education is the first step.

There are six regional accrediting agencies that oversee different sections of the country. They are:

  • Middle State Association of Colleges
  • New England Association of Schools and Colleges
  • North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
  • Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges
  • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
  • Western Associations of Schools and Colleges

Regional Accreditation Map

Unlike their Regional counterparts, National accreditors are not bound to specific geographic area, but rather evaluate certain types of higher learning institutions. For example, the Accrediting Bureau

of Health Education Schools (ABHES) is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as an institutional and specialized accreditor focusing on health care education. Many nationally accredited colleges and universities focus on vocational or trade focused education, for example nursing or medical assisting.

The type of institutional accreditation does not play a role in determining the quality of education at a specific college or university. There are many examples of high quality institutions and programs under both regional and national accreditation; however, lower quality providers with poor outcomes exist under both types of accreditation as well.

What You Must Ask Before Choosing a Program of Study?

1. Why are you attending a specific program?

If the sole goal of your completing a program of study is an immediate entry into the workforce, then institution’s accreditation source, whether national or regional, will likely not make much difference (assuming you are comparing programs

of similar cost and quality). If completing a

specific program will serve as an educational ladder stepping-stone to a higher degree, then transferability of the earned credits and/or academic and professional credentials must be considered. Each educational institution sets its own transfer of academic credit policies and there is no guarantee that any earned credits would transfer. As a general trend, most nationally accredited colleges and universities accept credits and credentials from both regionally and nationally accredited institutions. However, some regionally accredited schools do not transfer in academic credits earned at nationally accredited institutions. To learn about transfer of credit policies at any specific higher education provider, please contact the institution’s admissions and/or registration department, or refer to the school’s academic catalog.

2. What is the cost of the program?

Public universities and community colleges are, generally, regionally accredited and, since these schools are heavily subsidized by the taxpayers, their tuition and fees can be significantly less than at most private, nationally accredited institutions. However, competition for admission to a public university or community college could be much greater than at private institutions. When evaluating the value of an educational program, one must consider the entire cost

of attendance (COA). Questions regarding COA should be directed to the institution’s financial aid department. Among other factors that should be consider when evaluating the total value of a program are its acceptance and yield rates. In other words, how many qualified applicants receive admission offers and how many of those

enroll into the program of study? Conversely, how many qualified admissions applications are denied or waitlisted? The opportunity cost of waiting year after year to enroll into a specific program could become significant, as the earning potential that follows being a program graduate is delayed further and further.

3. What is the quality of the program?

As previously discussed, programmatic accreditation is voluntary. However, accreditation often signals an educational program’s higher level of commitment to excellence and high quality. Therefore, attending a program that is a candidate for or has obtained programmatic accreditation is highly recommended. Some of specialized programmatic accreditors are:

  • American Medical Association (AMA) accredits medical programs
  • Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET) accredits engineering programs
  • American Dental Association (ADA) accredits dentistry programs.
  • Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) formerly known as National Nursing League (NLN) accredits nursing programs
  • American Bar Association (ABA) accredits law programs
  • Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredits business and accounting programs

Finally, institutions of higher learning are required to publish statistics on outcomes of their educational programs. Graduation and retention rates, licensure examinations’ pass rates, and employment placement rates are examples of published outcomes that may be found on the schools’ websites or by contacting admissions departments.

Accreditation is, indeed, important and is a way to differentiate and select the institution and

program that best meet one’s educational and career goals.

For more information about accrediting bodies in the U.S. please visit these links:

Every year, National Nurses Week focuses attention on the diverse ways America’s 3.1 million registered nurses work to save lives and to improve the health of millions of individuals. This year, the American Nurses Association (ANA) has selected “Delivering Quality and Innovation in Patient Care as the theme for 2013.1

Annually, National Nurses Week begins on May 6, marked as RN Recognition Day, and ends on May 12, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, founder of nursing as a modern profession. Traditionally, National Nurses Week is devoted to highlighting the diverse ways in which registered nurses, who comprise the largest health care profession, are working to improve health care. During this week, Nightingale College honors its registered nurse graduates, current RN nursing students, and all nurses that walk in the footsteps of Florence Nightingale. Florence truly lit up the path for our success with her unwavering values.

Today and always, Nightingale College and its graduates walk in her footsteps of excellence, integrity, respecting humanity, continuous improvement, collaboration and accountability, and going beyond self.

Nightingale College understands the role RNs play in the ongoing improvement and transformation of health care systems of this great nation. ANA reports, “The Affordable Care Act and the Institute of medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing report places nurses at the center of health care transformation in the United States.”1 Nightingale College invites RNs everywhere to positively influence the quality of care and overall performance of the health care system to which they belong.

ANA’s website provides a brief history of National Nurses Week:

1953 Dorothy Sutherland of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare sent a proposal to President Eisenhower to proclaim a “Nurse Day” in October of the following year. The proclamation was never made.

1954 National Nurse Week was observed from October 11 – 16. The year of the observance marked the 100th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s mission to Crimea. Representative Frances P. Bolton sponsored the bill for a nurse week. Apparently, a bill for a National Nurse Week was introduced in the 1955 Congress, but no action was taken. Congress discontinued its practice of joint resolutions for national weeks of various kinds.

1972 Again a resolution was presented by the House of Representatives for the President to proclaim “National Registered Nurse Day.” It did not occur.

1974 In January of that year, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) proclaimed that May 12 would be “International Nurse Day.” (May 12 is the birthday of Florence Nightingale.) Since 1965, the ICN has celebrated “International Nurse Day.”

1974 In February of that year, a week was designated by the White House as National Nurse Week, and President Nixon issued a proclamation.

1978 New Jersey Governor Brendon Byrne declared May 6 as “Nurses Day.” Edward Scanlan, of Red Bank, N.J., took up the cause to perpetuate the recognition of nurses in his state. Mr. Scanlan had this date listed in Chase’s Calendar of Annual Events. He promoted the celebration on his own.

1981 ANA, along with various nursing organizations, rallied to support a resolution initiated by nurses in New Mexico, through their Congressman, Manuel Lujan, to have May 6, 1982, established as “National Recognition Day for Nurses.”

1982 In February, the ANA Board of Directors formally acknowledged May 6, 1982 as “National Nurses Day.” The action affirmed a joint resolution of the United States Congress designating May 6 as “National Recognition Day for Nurses.”

1982 President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation on March 25, proclaiming “National Recognition Day for Nurses” to be May 6, 1982.

1990 The ANA Board of Directors expanded the recognition of nurses to a week-long celebration, declaring May 6 – 12, 1991, as National Nurses Week.

1993 The ANA Board of Directors designated May 6 – 12 as permanent dates to observe National Nurses Week in 1994 and in all subsequent years.

1996 The ANA initiated “National RN Recognition Day” on May 6, 1996, to honor the nation’s indispensable registered nurses for their tireless commitment 365 days a year. The ANA encourages its state and territorial nurses associations and other organizations to acknowledge May 6, 1996 as “National RN Recognition Day.”

1997 The ANA Board of Directors, at the request of the National Student Nurses Association, designated May 8 as National Student Nurses Day.

As of 1998, May 8 is National Student Nurses Day and as of 2003, National School Nurse Day is celebrated on the Wednesday within National Nurses Week.

Nightingale College wishes all current and future RNs a happy Nurses Week!

Flame! Forward!

References:

  1. National Nurses Week, May 6, 2013

Nightingale College wishes to announce that it has changed

the dates for the site review for initial accreditation of its Associate Degree Nursing Program.

The general public was invited to meet the visiting team and share comments about the College’s program. The meeting was scheduled for January 23, 2013

at 3:00 p.m. at Nightingale College located at 4155 Harrison Blvd., Ogden, Utah. This has been cancelled. Further notice will be posted on our website with the rescheduled date and location.

Thanks for your continual support of Nightingale College!