Course descriptions can be found in the College Catalog.
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Remedial Course Descriptions

ENG 90: Developmental English
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction); self-paced, instructor-guided
Semester Credits: 0
Contact Hours: 45
The focus of this course is on preparing learners to work with and to compose college-level texts in English Composition. Topics covered include: reading and comprehending texts from various genres; drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading texts; expanding learner vocabulary; identifying and applying rhetorical strategies; analyzing texts for their main ideas and major and minor supporting details; using critical thinking skills when reading and writing; and working responsibly with others’ ideas using basic source documentation.
Note: This course is not a required part of any academic program; is not college-level; is not Title IV eligible; is not part of any institutional or programmatic accreditation grant; and is offered as a means of preparation for college-level English courses, with pass/fail grading.

MAT 90: Pre-Algebra
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction); self-paced, instructor-guided
Semester Credits: 0
Contact Hours: 45
The focus of this course is to prepare the learners for Algebra. Topics covered include: performing operations with integers, fractions, and decimals; solving application problems involving integers, fractions, and decimals; performing basic algebra skills including identifying algebraic components, combining like terms, and using the distributive property; introduction to percentages.
Note: This course is not a required part of any academic program; is not college-level; is not Title IV eligible; is not part of any institutional or programmatic accreditation grant; and is offered as a means of preparation for college-level English courses, with pass/fail grading.

General Education Course Descriptions

ENG 120: English Composition 1
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
This course helps learners develop quality writing skills by explaining and identifying the steps involved in the writing process. Six types of writing are examined: argumentative, compare/contrast, descriptive, narrative, persuasive, and summary. Learners will write a minimum of 20 pages as a requirement for this course. The importance of proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling is highlighted, as emphasis is placed on editing and revising pieces of writing. Learners also learn proper research techniques, utilizing the American Psychological Association (APA) style.

HUM 110: Western Civilization I
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
This course introduces western civilization from pre-history to the early modern era. Western Civilization refers to the civilization that began in the ancient Near East and then developed primarily in Europe, northern Africa and the westernmost edges of Asia. Learners will concentrate on several major themes: the rise and fall of the ancient and classical civilizations that were forerunners to the rise of the West, the cultural legacy of these civilizations, the changing role of religion in society and changes in religion itself, and the development of political institutions. Topics include ancient Greece, Rome, and Christian institutions of the Middle Ages and the emergence of national monarchies in western Europe.

MAT 100: Intermediate Algebra
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
This course provides a working knowledge of Intermediate Algebra and its applications. Emphasis is placed on algebraic techniques with polynomials, rational expressions, exponents, radical expressions and equations, factoring, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, logarithmic and exponential functions, and solving systems of two or more linear equations. Upon completion, learners will be able to solve real world problems and be prepared to take College Algebra.

PSY 201: Introduction to Psychology
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
This course is designed to give the learner a basic understanding of the psychology of human behavior. The learner will be given exposure to the concepts, terminology, principles, and theories that comprise an introductory course in psychology. Topics covered are to synthesize the broad range of knowledge about psychology, to emphasize research methodology, to encourage critical thinking, and to convey a multicultural approach that respects human diversity and individual differences.

SCI 220: Human Anatomy with Lab
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction, virtual lab)
Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 Lab)
Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 Lab)
In conjunction with SCI 221: Human Physiology, this course provides a comprehensive look at the human body’s anatomy and functions. Topics include organization of the body, characteristics of life, and anatomical terminology. The skin, skeletal system, muscles, digestive, urinary, lymphatic, circulatory, reproductive, and nervous systems are examined. Sensory organs and the endocrine system are also presented. This course contains a lab component (1 credit hour), where learners will be able to practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (3 semester credits) of the class.

SCI 221: Human Physiology with Lab
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction, virtual lab)
Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 Lab)
Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 Lab)
In conjunction with SCI 220: Human Anatomy, this course examines major parts of the body and how they work independently as well as together. Also explained are principles related to nutrition, metabolism, body fluid balances, and aging. Also presented are how the body maintains homeostasis, the relationship of chemistry to anatomy and physiology, and cell function and division. Several diseases and disorders are discussed as well as the cause, detection, and treatment of them. This course contains a lab component (1 credit hour), where learners will be able to practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (3 semester credits) of the class.

SCI 225: Pathophysiology
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
This course describes the general principles of disease then presents information dealing with specific disorders of body systems or individual organs. The purpose of this course is to provide the learner with basic understanding of pathophysiology as a change from normal physiological functioning of the various systems of the human body. The course is based on illness and disease within a systems framework across the lifespan. Emphasis is put on select illnesses most often encountered by health professionals. The course focuses on critical thinking used to analyze the signs and symptoms based on the pathophysiology of these conditions.

SOC 220: Introduction to Sociology
Delivery Modality: Onine (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, learners should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies.

Upper-Division General Education Course Descriptions

ANT 300: Cultural Anthropology
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
This course provides a solid introduction for learners who are new to the branch of cultural anthropology. Learners are presented with all the basic information pertinent to the field. The topics discussed include relevant anthropological theories, ethnocentrism and culture, language and communication, economic and political systems, kinship and descent, marriage and family, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, religion and belief systems, the effects of colonialism and industrialization, and globalization.

COM 301: Oral Communication
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
This basic course in speech is designed to develop each learner’s ability to communicate effectively in his or her academic, business, and social life. The major emphasis is on the preparation and delivery of formal speeches, but many areas of the communication process are explored. This course provides learners with the opportunity to practice and improve their listening and communication skills in English.

ENG 302: Technical Writing II
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 1 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 15
This course is the second of the 3-course technical writing series (ENG 301, ENG 302, and ENG 303). Throughout the 3-course series, learners will receive an overview of commonly encountered professional genres such as memos, reports, journal articles, and grant proposals. Learners gain practice writing in these genres, with an emphasis on clarity and concision. They develop more sophisticated research skills and gain experience in communicating specialized information to non-specialist readers. Finally, they are exposed to the range of professional writing careers as they explore writing on both theoretical and practical planes through consideration of audience as well as wider professional, social, and cultural contexts. In ENG 302: Technical Writing II, learners will build upon what they learned in ENG 301 and will be given writing assignments that coincide with the second semester RN-to-BSN nursing courses.

ENG 303: Technical Writing III
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 1 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 15
This course is the third of the 3-course technical writing series (ENG 301, ENG 302, and ENG 303). Throughout the 3-course series, learners will receive an overview of commonly encountered professional genres such as memos, reports, journal articles, and grant proposals. Learners gain practice writing in these genres, with an emphasis on clarity and concision. They develop more sophisticated research skills and gain experience in communicating specialized information to non-specialist readers. Finally, they are exposed to the range of professional writing careers as they explore writing on both theoretical and practical planes through consideration of audience as well as wider professional, social, and cultural contexts. In ENG 303: Technical Writing III, learners will build upon what they learned in ENG 301 and ENG 302, and will be given writing assignments that coincide with the third semester RN-to-BSN nursing courses.

ENG 310: Technical Writing
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
In this course, learners will receive an overview of commonly encountered professional genres such as memos, reports, journal articles, and grant proposals. Learners gain practice writing in these genres, with an emphasis on clarity and concision. They develop more sophisticated research skills and gain experience in communicating specialized information to non-specialist readers. Finally, they are exposed to the range of professional writing careers as they explore writing on both theoretical and practical planes through consideration of audience as well as wider professional, social, and cultural contexts. Learners will be given writing assignments that coincide with the sixth semester BMTC- to-BSN Bridge Program nursing courses.

HUM 300: Introduction to Philosophy
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
This course is a critical introduction to the field of philosophical inquiry. After defining philosophy and identifying the major fields of philosophical study, the course examines the history of Western thought, from the famous Greek philosophers up to the cutting-edge intellectuals of today. The course then dives into various thematic topics, including metaphysics, epistemology, free will and determinism, evil and the existence of God, personal identity, ethical values, and political philosophy. The course concludes with an analysis of different perspectives, including Eastern philosophies, and postcolonial thought.

MAT 320: Introduction to Statistics
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
In this course, learners will look at the properties behind the basic concepts of probability and statistics and focus on applications of statistical knowledge. Learners will learn about how statistics and probability work together. The subject of statistics involves the study of methods for collecting, summarizing, and interpreting data. Learners will learn how to understand the basics of drawing statistical conclusions. This course will begin with descriptive statistics and the foundation of statistics, move on to probability and random distributions, the latter of which enables statisticians to work with several aspects of random events and their applications. Finally, learners will examine a number of ways to investigate the relationships between various characteristics of data.

General Electives Course Descriptions

SCI 131: Introduction to Nutrition
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction)
Semester Credits: 3 (Didactic)
Contact Hours: 45
This course will provide an understanding of basic nutrition science. Learners will become familiar with the principles of diet planning, government standards, and food labeling. They will also be instructed about the biological functions and food sources of each nutrient, energy balance, weight management, physical activity, the role of nutrition in chronic disease development, nutrition through the life cycle, and food safety issues.

SCI 251: Microbiology with Lab
Delivery Modality: Online (online didactic instruction, virtual lab)
Semester Credits: 4 (3 Didactic, 1 Lab)
Contact Hours: 75 (45 Didactic, 30 Lab)
This course is designed to teach microbiology as it applies to the health care field. The course will explore pathogenic microorganisms and their role in human disease, human immunology, symptoms and treatment of microbial infection, and preventative measures against microbial infection. This course contains a lab component (1 credit hour), where learners will be able to practice and apply principles they are learning in the didactic portion (3 semester credits) of the class.