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Summer 2017 Graduation Recap

Those who arrived early to see their nurses graduate were lucky, because by ten minutes till, there wasn’t a spare seat to be found among the 1,500 in the auditorium.

The friends and family in those seats jumped to their feet clapping and whistling as the triumphant procession of graduates entered the room and took their seats.

Fifty-seven Nightingale learners graduated this semester, completing their Associate Degree in Nursing. As they took their seats, their excitement was more obvious than kids on Christmas morning.   

“It always seems impossible until it is done,” said valedictorian Annie Dilling, quoting Nelson Mandela in her speech. “Well my friends and fellow graduates, we are done.”

Cheers and whoops erupted from the soon-to-be nurses.

What an accomplishment! We are so proud of all these learners who have studied countless hours, sacrificed precious sleep, and dedicated so much of their time and energy to becoming nurses. We know you will be incredible in this noble profession. These graduates will now work towards passing the NCLEX-RN and becoming licensed as registered nurses.

The Faculty and Valedictorian Addresses

After the announcements had been given, Amanda Nussbaum, lead faculty for Twin Falls and assistant professor, gave a moving speech about how nursing isn’t always about how much you know from your textbooks. Most of the time, she said, it’s about how much you demonstrate care to the patient.

She also threw in some punny jokes, after a friend on Facebook told her she would give her $5 for each one she told. We love her attitude.

The valedictorian address, given by Annie Dilling, focused on what it means to truly be a nurse. “Being a nurse is 90% calling and 10% job,” she said. Although there are challenges and demands in the nursing field, it is a profession in which you can truly make a difference. We’re proud of you, Annie.

The Nursing Pinning

After the speeches, a small group of graduates was called to the stage. Their selected family members, dressed in their best, had the honor of presenting them with their nursing pin. The nursing pin is a symbolic medal of honor, and a commitment to treat patients with respect. It is a poignant rite of passage into their nursing career.

Many of the graduates had their children pin them, and one little tyke ran around the stage refusing to leave after his mom was pinned. A few of the graduates tried to catch him, but he ran circles around them until they cornered him.

Other graduates were pinned by their spouses or parents. One graduate had someone stand in for her mother, who has passed on, in a touching tribute.

The Lighting of the Lamps

The lighting of the lamps is a reverent ordeal where the Nightingale graduates light each of their lamps to symbolize the lamp that Florence Nightingale tirelessly carried to and from each sickbed.

“The graduates light the Nursing Lamp as a demonstration of confidence, competence, and compassion and as a promise to meet every professional challenge with utmost skill, sound clinical judgment, and inexhaustible caring,” reads the description.

They then turned to the audience, and with smiling faces and more than a few teary eyes, recited the Florence Nightingale pledge. The pledge says, in part, “I pledge 

to care for my patients with all of the knowledge, skills and understanding that I possess, without regard to race, color, creed, politics, or social status.” We know you will, graduates.

What this means for Nightingale

While we celebrate the achievements of the graduates, this graduation is also an accomplishment for Nightingale College. Not only is this the largest graduating 

cohort in the school’s history, it also marks the first graduation of the Twin Falls, Idaho DDC. Six graduates came from the Twin Falls DDC, along with 17 from Pocatello, three from Saint George, and 30 from Ogden.

We hope that these new nurses will continue to keep the flame alive as they care for their patients. We look forward to seeing

 how they better the health in their communities. Congratulations, graduates! FLAME! FORWARD!

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A Salute to All Nurses: Happy Nurses Week

May 6 through May 12 is National Nurses Week. Nightingale College wants to thank all nurses for their hard work and dedication to improving their communities through better health. We are honored to have the opportunity to educate the nurses of tomorrow who will selflessly be serving communities across the nation, driving positive health outcomes for their patients and community. With confidence, competence, and compassion, nurses are at the front lines of health care. We wish all current and future nurses a Happy Nurses Week.

To take a look back at the history of National Nurses Week, click here to read our blog Nightingale College Celebrates National Nurses Week.

Happy Nurses Week!

 

Our Nursing Faculty, Fall 2016

Nurses Week

Thank you to the Nightingale College faculty family. Your dedication to our learners is remarkable and we couldn’t imagine a better group of individuals to lead our learners to becoming competent nurses.

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Graduation of the Fall Class of 2016

Congratulations to our most recent ADN graduates who walked across the stage with their nursing pin and associate degree in nursing. Graduation is one of our most favorite times of the year because we get to celebrate the hard word and dedication of our learners. Furthermore, the Fall Class of 2016 is monumental in Nightingale College’s history. It is the first graduation that includes learners from our DDC locations. The graduating class consisted of learners not only from the Ogden location but from St. George, Utah and Pocatello, Idaho. We look forward to the graduates’ future in nursing.

Missed graduation? Check out the Live Video we took during graduation on our Facebook page. Click here to go to our videos section.

Valedictorian Address by Mandy Wilson

Faculty Address

 

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Class of September 2016 Graduation Recap

Life is not about warming yourself by the fire, life is about building the fire. And generosity is the match…If you want happiness for an hour, take a nap, but if you want happiness for a lifetime, help somebody. (Larry Lucchino)

Congratulations! We are very excited to see what amazing things you all will accomplish as a nurse. Always remember to practice with confidence, competence, and compassion.

Faculty Address: Earlene Cooper

Valedictorian Speech: Peter Schultz

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Local Healthcare Facilities Recruit Nightingale College as a Means of Retaining Locally Grown Nurses

Healthcare employers show investment in local employment by promoting the need for homegrown registered nurses

TWIN FALLS, Idaho (July 13, 2016) – Local healthcare facilities have successfully recruited Nightingale College’s associate and bachelor’s degree nursing programs to help retain and promote homegrown registered nurses.

According to the Idaho Nursing Overview published in 2015 by the Idaho Department of Labor, Idaho will experience a 2.5 percent annual growth within the nursing profession. Although the report states that Idaho graduates plenty of nurses to meet the demand, only 60 percent of graduates remain in the state to work, leaving employers to recruit from other sections of Idaho and pursuing out-of-state candidates. Forward-thinking local healthcare employers have partnered with Nightingale College to provide an educational opportunity designed to expand the pool of locally grown and ready-to-work registered nurses. These healthcare employers investing in local education and employment are preparing their communities to support fully staffed and safe nursing units by reducing of the high turnover rate within the nursing profession and contributing to the increase in the number of qualified RN applicants in the area.

Nightingale College, a Utah-based nursing school, supports this growing need for nurses by bringing the associate and bachelor’s degree nursing education programs in-house to healthcare facilities. The College’s approach to supply nursing education through distance learning and local on-ground lab and clinical experiences allows healthcare partners the availability to continuously grow and maintain homegrown registered nurses.

“The unique struggles Partners located outside of urban centers face when it comes to having qualified, sufficient and effective nurses keep them from meeting the needs of their communities,” said Jill McCullough, DDC Coordinator for Nightingale College. “Our mission to help these facilities retain local nurses who are passionate about the community’s health and will drive positive health solutions forward. It is fulfilling for us to join together with our Partners in pursuit of such a cause.”

Nightingale College continues enrollment for the next open semester in August 2016 with the help and partnership of local facilities Desert View Care Center, Lincoln County Care Center, Mini-Cassia Care Center, Oak Creek Rehabilitation, and Sawtooth Behavioral Health.

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May 2016 Graduation Recap

Last Friday, we celebrated the graduating cohort of 33 ADN learners and 2 BSN learners. We are so proud of their success and can’t wait to see what the future has in store for them.

BSN Faculty Address by BSN Program Manager, Shanda Clark

Valedictorian Address by Joshua Fowles

ADN Faculty Address by Assistant Professor, James Benson

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It’s Easy to Renew Your FAFSA

fafsa Every year students need to renew their FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) for the 2016-2017 year. Dealing with financial aid can seem tricky and complicated at times, but it is important to stay on top of the deadlines associated with the 2016-2017 FAFSA. Now is the time to renew your FAFSA so don’t wait! To qualify for Federal Student Aid, FAFSA applications must be completed and submitted by June 30, 2016. Follow the guidelines and steps below that will help make the FAFSA Renewal process as stress-free as possible. The Financial Aid Department is here to help at any point during the process. Make an appointment with a Financial Aid Advisor now to get assistance: (801) 689-2160. Start renewing your FAFSA by visiting the Federal Student Aid website.

Who needs to fill out the 2016-2017 FAFSA? You need to fill out the 2016-2017 FAFSA if you will be attending Nightingale College during the Summer Semester that starts May 2, 2016 and the semesters following.  The Summer Semester falls under the 2016-2017 FAFSA timeframe so don’t let the dates confuse you.

When does the 2016-2017 FAFSA begin? The 2016-2017 FAFSA begins on July 1, 2016.

How does the FAFSA correlate with my taxes? It is advisable to hold off on your 2016-2017 FAFSA until you have completed your 2015 Federal Tax Return because you will need the correct financial information from 2015.

I don’t know if I should fill it out. If you are unsure whether you need to fill out the 2016-2017 FAFSA, do so anyways or speak with a Financial Aid Advisor who will be able to guide you in the right direction.

What happens if I do not have my FAFSA completed by the deadline? You may not qualify for Federal Student Aid for the following semesters:

  • Summer Semester: May 2, 2016 – August 19, 2016
  • Fall Semester: August 29, 2016 – December 16, 2016
  • Spring Semester: January 2, 2017 – April 21, 2017
  • Summer Semester: May 1, 2017 – August 18, 2017

How do I complete the FAFSA? Completing the FAFSA isn’t as complicated as one may think. If you have already completed the 2015-2016 FAFSA, your information will automatically be transferred to the 2016-2017 FAFSA. If this is your first time completing the FAFSA, you will need to start a new FAFSA. Visit FAFSA.ed.gov to get started.

What about my FAFSA ID number? Don’t forget to remember your FAFSA ID number and keep that information private. Do not share your FAFSA ID number with anyone. However, if you do forget your FAFSA ID number, you’re not alone. You can easily reset it by visiting the website and either receiving the reset password link through email or by providing personal information.

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Have a Grievance?

“Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.” – Murphy’s Law

Everyone has had their fair share of experiencing first-hand Murphy’s Law, including Nightingale College. The staff and faculty work diligently to bring learners the best service and support, but when things go wrong, and things will, be assured that Nightingale is searching for the best possible solution. Nightingale is constantly growing and adapting new policies and structures to improve not only the College but its learners and graduates.

So, if you are experiencing any aftershocks, the College provides several avenues that can be used to address your concerns. Frustrated by a policy of the College? Stressed because the schedule hasn’t been finalized? Or that a roadblock keeps rolling in between you and your instructor? Rest assured that you are not alone. While some concerns may not be in the control of the College, we are here to listen in order to improve the learning environment and make your nursing journey as stress-free as possible.

To help the College has established steps that can be taken once initiated by the learner. (Full directions can be found in the Learner Grievances section of the College Catalog.)

1. Take your concern to the direct faculty or staff member. Majority of all concerns can be satisfied by taking this first step, but if you feel your concern has not been adequately addressed, we have further steps you can take.
2. Take your concern to the Program Manager. The Program Manger will thoroughly asses the state of your concern to alleviate any tension it may be causing you.
3. If it has not be addressed by either the faculty or staff member, or the Program Manager, take your concern and present it as a written document to the Campus Director or Dedicated Distance Cohort (DDC) Coordinator who will investigate your concern to the full extent.
4. Finally, if steps one through three haven’t been able to resolve your concern, learners may take a written description of the concern to the College’s accrediting and approval agencies, which can be found in the Approvals, Affiliations, and Accreditation section of the College catalog.

Although keep in mind that Nightingale does have an entire department dedicated to helping learners throughout their time here—the Learner Advising and Life Resources Department. With the genuine desire for you to succeed, the advisors are here to provide you with useful resources and act as a bridge between you and the administrative department.

We encourage and welcome learners’ insights and suggestions. So, next time you find yourself frustrated by a College-related issue, don’t shy away but speak up, and help us improve the College’s functions for the benefit of the learners and the culture of Nightingale College.

Need to talk with Learner Advising and Life Resources? Call the College at (801) 689.2160, or stop by. Our doors are always open.

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2 Major Announcements by Nightingale College

Nightingale College was invited to appear on Channel 4’s Good Things Utah. During the segment, Nightingale College’s CEO, Mikhail Shneyder, announced two major accomplishments:

#1 Nightingale’s nursing program has become a fully accredited nursing program through ACEN.

#2 Nightingale has announced its BSN program is starting.

The College was also recognized for being #3 in UTAH for first time pass rates on the NCLEX exam for ADN Programs. This is an outstanding accomplishment and shows the quality of education delivered by the College to its students. Watch it:

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Nightingale’s Nursing Program Successfully Passes ACEN’s Stage II

Nightingale College announced back in January that the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Program hosted a successful site visit for the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). ACEN site evaluators recommended the program for initial accreditation for a 5-year term. Members of Nightingale’s administration attended step 2, Evaluation Review Panel (ERP), and have reported the College passed stage 2! The final step, the Board of Commissioners Meeting, July 10 – 11, 2014, will take place in Atlanta, Georgia. The College will receive the final decision letter in mid-August 2014.

Nightingale College thanks all its staff, students, graduates, and community partners that contributed to the ongoing success of the nursing program!

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Happy Nurses Week 2014!

Every year, National Nurses Week focuses attention on the diverse ways America’s 3.1 million registered nurses work to save lives and to improve the health of millions of individuals. This year, the American Nurses Association (ANA) has selected “Nurses Leading the Way” as the theme for 2014.

Annually, National Nurses Week begins on May 6, marked as RN Recognition Day, and ends on May 12, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, founder of nursing as a modern profession. Traditionally, National Nurses Week is devoted to highlighting the diverse ways in which registered nurses, who comprise the largest health care profession, are working to improve health care. During this week, Nightingale College honors its registered nurse graduates, current RN nursing students, and all nurses that walk in the footsteps of Florence Nightingale. Florence truly lit up the path for our success with her unwavering values.

Today and always, Nightingale College and its graduates walk in her footsteps of excellence, integrity, respecting humanity, continuous improvement, collaboration and accountability, and going beyond self.

Nightingale College understands the role RNs play in the ongoing improvement and transformation of health care systems of this great nation. ANA reports, “The Affordable Care Act and the Institute of medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing report places nurses at the center of health care transformation in the United States.” Nightingale College invites RNs everywhere to positively influence the quality of care and overall performance of the health care system to which they belong.

Happy nurses week 2014!

Nightingale is Now a Member of the SOC

Nightingale College is Now Officially a Member of the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Consortium

Nightingale College was approved to join a special group of 1900 colleges and universities to help serve the National Guard, reserves, new recruits, and veterans, in addition to more than 500,000 active-duty servicemembers. The College affirms its commitment to help assist the special conditions faced by military students who want to obtain a college education.

What is the SOC Consortium?

Servicemembers Opportunity CollegesThe SOC Consortium, comprised of 1,900 college and university members, enrolls hundreds of thousands of servicemembers, their family members, and veterans annually in associate, bachelor, and graduate-level degree programs on school campuses, military installations, armories within the United States and overseas, and through distance learning and learning assessment. These voluntary programs are a significant joint venture and require strong commitment and coordination among academic institutions and agencies, the Military Services, including the Coast Guard, and the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD).

SOC is a vehicle to help coordinate voluntary postsecondary education opportunities for servicemembers. SOC does this by:

  • seeking to stimulate and help the higher education community understand and respond to special needs of servicemembers;
  • advocating the flexibility needed to improve access to and availability of educational programs for servicemembers;
  • helping the Military Services, including the Coast Guard, understand the resources, limits, and requirements of higher education;
  • helping the higher education community understand the resources, limits, and requirements of the Military Services, including the Coast Guard; and
  • seeking to strengthen liaison and working relationships among military and higher education representatives.

To read more about the SOC please visit the SOC Consortium website

Nightingale College Now Offers Yellow Ribbon

As a member of the SOC, the College applied and was approved for the Yellow Ribbon program. The Yellow Ribbon program makes additional financial aid funds available for qualified candidate’s education without an additional charge to the GI bill entitlement. The College voluntarily entered into the Yellow Ribbon Agreement with VA. VA matches the amount selected by the College and issues payments directly to the institution.

To read more about, visit: Yellow Ribbon Program – Education and Training

Nightingale College Thanks All Servicemembers

Nightingale College thanks all Servicemembers for their sacrifice. The College is dedicated to doing what it can to help aid Servicemembers in their nursing education goals. The College is finalizing the Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), after which, the College will be able to offer military students Tuition Assistance. Our kindest regards go to all our Servicemembers and their families.

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Successful ACEN Site Visit!

Nightingale College is proud to announce that the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Program hosted a successful site visit for the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). ACEN site evaluators recommended the program for initial accreditation for a 5-year term. The remaining 2 tiers in the initial accreditation process are the Evaluation Review Panel (ERP), June 2 – 6, 2014, and the Board of Commissioners Meeting, July 10 – 11, 2014, both of which will take place in Atlanta, Georgia. The College will receive the final decision letter in mid-August 2014.

Nightingale College thanks all its staff, students, graduates, and community partners that contributed to this momentous event!

Public Notice: ACEN Site Visit In January!

Nightingale College will host a site review for initial accreditation of its Associate Degree Nursing Program by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN).

You are invited to meet the site visit team and share your comments about the program at 3:00pm on January 22, 2014 at Nightingale College, 4155 Harrison Blvd., Suite 100, Ogden, UT 84403.

Written comments can be emailed directly to:

Dr. Sharon Tanner, Chief Executive Officer

sjtanner@acenursing.org

 

All written comments should be received by January 14, 2014

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How To Get A License in Another State

By: Kathleen Frisbie, MSN, RN, Faculty

In order to practice as a nurse, one must obtain licensure. The governing bodies which grant licensure are individual State Boards of Nursing. Licensure is the process by which boards of nursing grant permission to an individual to engage in nursing practice after determining that the applicant has attained the competency necessary to perform a unique scope of practice (More at: NCSBN – About Nursing Licensure). Each State Board of Nursing determines if an individual meets the criteria for licensure. Once eligibility for initial licensure is verified, the individual may seek licensure in their state of residence through testing. Across all U.S. jurisdictions, the national nursing licensure examination is the NCLEX (National Council Licensure Examination). This is a psychometrically valid examination designed to test minimal competency as a nurse. Passage of this exam indicates that the individual has the minimal competency needed to practice nursing safely. If the individual currently holds a nursing license and is seeking licensure in a new state, they may seek licensure by endorsement. Policies regarding licensure by endorsement vary from state to state. Those seeking licensure by endorsement must contact the appropriate state board for regulations.

Licensure by endorsement requires the individual to complete an application to the state board of nursing in which they are seeking licensure. The individual must possess equivalent credentials and qualifications as those seeking the same licensure by examination. The individual must have graduated from a nursing program approved by the state board of nursing and hold a license with no restrictions. Some states require specific continuing education requirements as well as holding an unencumbered license. Most states also require the individual to pass a criminal background check.

Another consideration in determining whether you need to seek licensure in another state is the Nurse Licensure Compact. The Nurse Licensure Compact allows nurses to hold licensure in their home state but practice in other states without obtaining another license. Not all states belong to the compact so it is important to determine if the state you want to work in belongs to the compact. Currently there are 24 states in the Nurse Licensure Compact. The list of states can be found at NCSBN – Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC) States.

Licensed nurses are eligible for a multistate (compact) license if: 1. they legally reside in a compact state; 2. hold a current RN or LPN license in good standing; 3. declare a compact state as their primary residence. It is important to note that licensees must abide by the practice act in each state. Therefore, it is imperative to review the practice act for whatever state work is done. To assist individuals in determining the process for seeking multistate licensing a flowchart demonstrating the process can be found at NCSBN – Navigating the Nurse Licensure Compact: Licensure by Endorsement.

What happens when a nurse moves to another state? If the current primary state of residency is a compact state and the new state is also a compact state, then the nurse can practice on the former residency license for up to 30 days. After the 30 days, the nurse is required to apply for licensure by endorsement, pay any applicable fees and complete a declaration of primary state of residency in the new home state, whereby a new multistate license is issued and the former license is inactivated. Proof of residency may be required. If the move is to a non-compact state, then the nurse must seek licensure by endorsement, pay any applicable fees and will be issued a single state license. The nurse is required to notify the former state board of nursing they are moving out of state.

There are definite advantages of the Nurse Licensure Compact. The most obvious advantage is that it provides greater mobility for nurses. Improvement in mobility of nurses can have a direct impact on improving access to quality healthcare services and addresses workforce needs. Another advantage is that the compact licensure can provide improved access during times of a disaster. In today’s fast paced technological world, the concept of telemedicine and telenursing is becoming a reality. The compact licensure has provided clarification of the authority to practice for nurses engaged in telenursing.

The processes for obtaining licensure in different states are relatively straight forward and simple. Individuals seeking licensure in a different state should carefully read the policies located on the State Board of Nursing websites. It is also imperative that nurses understand the Nurse Practice Acts in whatever state they are licensed to practice in. If the individual has any questions, they should contact the State Board of Nursing for clarification.

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Nightingale College Celebrates National Nurses Week

Every year, National Nurses Week focuses attention on the diverse ways America’s 3.1 million registered nurses work to save lives and to improve the health of millions of individuals. This year, the American Nurses Association (ANA) has selected “Delivering Quality and Innovation in Patient Care as the theme for 2013.1

Annually, National Nurses Week begins on May 6, marked as RN Recognition Day, and ends on May 12, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, founder of nursing as a modern profession. Traditionally, National Nurses Week is devoted to highlighting the diverse ways in which registered nurses, who comprise the largest health care profession, are working to improve health care. During this week, Nightingale College honors its registered nurse graduates, current RN nursing students, and all nurses that walk in the footsteps of Florence Nightingale. Florence truly lit up the path for our success with her unwavering values.

Today and always, Nightingale College and its graduates walk in her footsteps of excellence, integrity, respecting humanity, continuous improvement, collaboration and accountability, and going beyond self.

Nightingale College understands the role RNs play in the ongoing improvement and transformation of health care systems of this great nation. ANA reports, “The Affordable Care Act and the Institute of medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing report places nurses at the center of health care transformation in the United States.”1 Nightingale College invites RNs everywhere to positively influence the quality of care and overall performance of the health care system to which they belong.

ANA’s website provides a brief history of National Nurses Week:

1953 Dorothy Sutherland of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare sent a proposal to President Eisenhower to proclaim a “Nurse Day” in October of the following year. The proclamation was never made.

1954 National Nurse Week was observed from October 11 – 16. The year of the observance marked the 100th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s mission to Crimea. Representative Frances P. Bolton sponsored the bill for a nurse week. Apparently, a bill for a National Nurse Week was introduced in the 1955 Congress, but no action was taken. Congress discontinued its practice of joint resolutions for national weeks of various kinds.

1972 Again a resolution was presented by the House of Representatives for the President to proclaim “National Registered Nurse Day.” It did not occur.

1974 In January of that year, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) proclaimed that May 12 would be “International Nurse Day.” (May 12 is the birthday of Florence Nightingale.) Since 1965, the ICN has celebrated “International Nurse Day.”

1974 In February of that year, a week was designated by the White House as National Nurse Week, and President Nixon issued a proclamation.

1978 New Jersey Governor Brendon Byrne declared May 6 as “Nurses Day.” Edward Scanlan, of Red Bank, N.J., took up the cause to perpetuate the recognition of nurses in his state. Mr. Scanlan had this date listed in Chase’s Calendar of Annual Events. He promoted the celebration on his own.

1981 ANA, along with various nursing organizations, rallied to support a resolution initiated by nurses in New Mexico, through their Congressman, Manuel Lujan, to have May 6, 1982, established as “National Recognition Day for Nurses.”

1982 In February, the ANA Board of Directors formally acknowledged May 6, 1982 as “National Nurses Day.” The action affirmed a joint resolution of the United States Congress designating May 6 as “National Recognition Day for Nurses.”

1982 President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation on March 25, proclaiming “National Recognition Day for Nurses” to be May 6, 1982.

1990 The ANA Board of Directors expanded the recognition of nurses to a week-long celebration, declaring May 6 – 12, 1991, as National Nurses Week.

1993 The ANA Board of Directors designated May 6 – 12 as permanent dates to observe National Nurses Week in 1994 and in all subsequent years.

1996 The ANA initiated “National RN Recognition Day” on May 6, 1996, to honor the nation’s indispensable registered nurses for their tireless commitment 365 days a year. The ANA encourages its state and territorial nurses associations and other organizations to acknowledge May 6, 1996 as “National RN Recognition Day.”

1997 The ANA Board of Directors, at the request of the National Student Nurses Association, designated May 8 as National Student Nurses Day.

As of 1998, May 8 is National Student Nurses Day and as of 2003, National School Nurse Day is celebrated on the Wednesday within National Nurses Week.

Nightingale College wishes all current and future RNs a happy Nurses Week!

Flame! Forward!

References:

  1. National Nurses Week, May 6, 2013